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In a campus library or other public place, typically many people share the same PC with the Bloomberg terminal software.

Is there a way to prevent users from creating new logins? Is there a way to delete logins not authorised anymore?

Regards, Antonio

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Perhaps this is better directed to Bloomberg help? –  John Dec 14 '12 at 15:12
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<HELP><HELP> <Ctrl>+C <Ctrl>+V –  Joshua Ulrich Dec 14 '12 at 15:21
    
From the FAQ: "requests for support should be filed with the software vendor". –  chrisaycock Dec 17 '12 at 2:56
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closed as off topic by chrisaycock Dec 17 '12 at 2:55

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1 Answer

No there is no way to restrict anyone from creating a new login and password. The point of this particular subscription is to have one local terminal that anyone with access to the terminal can use. Other subscriptions allow only one user access but in exchange offers that one user through a BB Anywhere addon (at no extra charge) can access the terminal from anywhere. So, I do not see your point why you would want to restrict anyone from accessing the terminal in your library. Creating new logins does not add any overhead, not memory wise, not CPU wise, and not hard drive disk space wise. Its not like a windows user where the machine sets up an entirely new path with tons of files and user configs. All configs of a BB users are saved and kept on the BB servers. I share this information because I know someone who works at BB.

If illegal content is disseminated over BB-chat or messages then you would want to talk to BB to get the users information so that you can follow up with the user yourself, but you would need to be an account authorized person to do so.

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Thanks for your help. Motivation was just that: illegal content dissemination, maybe under a forged name, of which the institution/staff can be held responsible. Then, a good policy (to prevent abuse) can be assigning a different Windows account to each user using the BB terminal. God bless Stackexchange. @John: may be Freddy is in the BB help crew :-) –  antonio Dec 14 '12 at 15:56
    
@antonio, you may want to check the legal liability terms of the specific contract under which your library/university signed up for a BB account. Re your hunch, I would be happy if most staff at BB's help desk were more honest and forthcoming in their dealings with clients. –  Matt Wolf Dec 14 '12 at 16:18
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