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11

There was a proxy called the ECU. You should be able to use the weights on the Wikipedia page to get a time series back to 1979. Alternatively, the St. Louis FRED also provides this time series.


8

In 1945 at Bretton Woods, the war-time allies agreed on an international gold standard to stabilise the world's economy. Gold was fixed at \$35 / ounce and all other currencies were pegged to that price via the US dollar. The US became the reserve currency of the world. The problems for the US began immediately. In order to ensure liquidity – an ...


5

OpenGamma has a good resource for market conventions.


3

for Japan, act/365 for the domestic market, and act/360 for the euroyen market. For swaps, fixed leg convention is 6m libor act/365, floating leg, if based on libor, is the 6m rate act/360, if tibor, then the 3m rate act/365.


3

Check out: "Universal hedging: Optimizing currency risk and reward in international equity portfolios," Fischer Black - Financial Analysts Journal, 1989. as well as many of the subsequent research that references this article (via Google Scholar, for instance). Good luck.


2

2) you only take trading days for your analysis because taking in account days on which no price changes took place would shift results in a wrong direction. For exmple, you mostly take 250 trading days p.a. 3) Your time interval up to 2007 is okay and excludes the financial crisis, which is a non-normal circumstance. Therefore, your time interval can be ...


2

Amirsani, Here couple points how I would proceed: I would first look to divide your time series into different clusters, enough so that different market dynamics fall into different clusters. I guess you will not be trading a single asset and thus you will not just optimize over a single stock or options contract. I would strongly try to discourage from ...


2

You are not doing anything wrong. You just need to multiply the absolute return by the currency conversion factor. Example: You trade 200,000,000 yen notional and generate a return of 16% on that notional, then simply multiply 32,000,000 jpy gain by your conversion factor 0.0126 to yield a return of 403,200 USD. The return of 16% was generated on the ...


2

first of all, there is nothing wrong in a currency-only portfolio to be dollar long and short the cross currencies. If that is what your model predicts and if you have a high confidence in the predictions and standard error being low then why do you have issues being dollar long and short the other currencies? You can implement boundary conditions, such as ...


2

A partial answer… For Black-Litterman, an equilibrium no arbitrage condition such as interest rate parity suggests investors would be indifferent between investing in either the foreign or domestic currency. Thus, you could use a constant zero return for all currencies in your opportunity set as the equilibrium model. What this ultimately would do is act ...


2

From a practical standpoint, the conversion rate can be kept constant during the day. It won't be precise, but it'll be fast. Stat arb backtesters have plenty of precedent where the entry price is the day's close plus a slippage factor. So if your goal is adversarial research (where there question is "would this strategy work?"), then you could add a ...


2

There are two factors here, which might or might not be conflicting. 1) You want to mimic what will happen in production. If your production system sweeps currencies once a day, then backtest that way. If your clearing broker only calculates margin at the end of the day, then do the same in backtests. If you will only resize your portfolio once a month, ...


2

The bank in china has to have an account at an intermediary bank, and order a transfer from that account to the account of the US bank. Therefore the chinese bank needs to have the dollars.


2

Position here is the residual amount of one or other currency at the end: You gave us: Time | Amount | Rate | t1 100 1.2636 t2 -1000 1.2599 t3 200 1.1612 Assuming the Amount is amount paid in USD, and the rate is EUR/USD: Time | Amount | Rate | EUR balance | USD balance t0 0 0 t1 ...


2

Perhaps this paper by Hyun Woo Byun and coauthors is what you're looking for: Using a Principal Component Analysis to develop Multi-Currency Trading algorithms in the FX market They apply principal component analysis to a currency basket of 9 pairs with a 2 month rolling window. In a second step, various techniques (logistic regression, decision trees, ...


1

It is not completely clear to me which question you are asking: is it I have fundamental data, now how do I translate that into risk-adjusted return? or is it I have a model that translates into risk adjusted returns, now how do I allocate funds to each currency pair? If you are asking the first question, you will need to provide more ...


1

For large currency transactions, the big banks go through an intermediary called CLS. Both sides to a transaction transfer funds (in form of central bank deposits) to the CLS group. Then simultaneously these are transferred to the respective parties. Or if one side fails to deliver CLS returns the funds of the other party. See ...


1

If you are specifically looking to analyze the US dollar, you can use the US dollar index $USDX (or dollar spot index DXY). There are many additional "baskets" for this and other currencies, such as Markit iBoxxFX Trade-Weighted Indices, based on central banks’ basket exchange rates, which track the performance of a currency against a defined basket of ...


1

Correct, USD libor is based on act/360, AUD on act/365 for currencies.


1

Did the portfolio manager have the option of investing in emerging markets? If yes, use MSCI All-World. If the portfolio has holdings based in countries with "developed markets" yet has has emerging markets exposure to revenue/earnings, the convention is to use MSCI World.


1

I have never seen such an adjustment. While monthly data are irregularly sampled in time (in every way...calendar days, trading days, seconds, etc), that irregularity is likely to be a smaller effect than your choice of data frequency (monthly, weekly, daily data). That said, your question is intriguing because in other fields they do have to deal with ...


1

Compounding the monthly excess returns won't provide the annual excess return. You need to compute the difference between the annual return of the portfolio and the annual return of the benchmark. To illustrate this let's look at an example. Consider the following two situations: The benchmark performs well with a $2\%$ return each month; The benchmark ...


1

This is actually a stylized example of the classic dual-listed companies "arbitrage", the most famous example of which is Royal Dutch Shell. It is not a pure arbitrage, but rather is a case of "statistical arbitrage", specifically pairs trading. First, express the prices of Y and Z in terms of X, and let's rename X "\$" for convenience's sake. Then Y ...


1

Here's a little bit of everything. 1) Some papers on foreign reserves that are used to defend a country's currency, and the flexibility of their exchange rate: http://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/wp/2001/wp0118.pdf http://www.eusanz.org/pdf/conf04/choi_baek.pdf 2) Some papers on generic modeling of exchange rates: ...


1

Not realy a quant question but funny though, Here are my two euro-cents, I would say that you should ask them for 100-USD times the exchange rate at the date you lend them, plus the interest rates amount that can be calculated by compounding EUR EONIA rate on the period you lend them that money. Regards



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