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9

CVA desks are not front office as they have no dealings with external clients. They can be considered "smart middle office" as they are a necessary part of the plumbing to facilitate the core activity of the bank, which is to trade as many derivatives as possible with clients, all of whom have varying levels of credit risk. Essentially, it allows traders in ...


6

In principle you could say they mainly do risk management on bank level, but also make $ on the way trading out the counterparty risks. Quoting a post in Willmott: "here's how you make profits on a CVA desk. 1) you get paid by an internal desk to cover their c/p risk. you stay long and the credit tightens... you make money (similar to #2 below) 2) Prop ...


5

In some banks the CVA desk is not expected to make profits (or losses). If they are having profit it is because they are overcharging CVA from other internal desks (and hence making those desks less competitive to external clients). If they are making losses it is because they are not pricing correctly the CVA (and therefore not able to buy enough hedges ...


4

Book: Counterparty Credit Risk: The new challenge for global financial markets by Jon Gregory


4

http://defaultrisk.com/ Main Authors, Papers & Book links, recommendations. Should be all you need.


3

This is an oft-debated topic among CVA/DVA professionals at banks. The key question, as pointed out by one of the comments, is whether a bank can derive some type of benefit from the increase in its own credit spread (and thereby make less of a CVA charge on the proposed transaction). The two sides to the argument are (a) on the one hand, surely by ...


2

I recommend the book The Basel II Risk Parameters. This book is primarily a collection of articles on the development, validation and stress testing of the risk parameters. The good thing about this book is that it provides an overview of the methodologies used which should be easy to follow for an experienced credit risk professional. However, it does not ...


2

Modelling, Pricing, and Hedging Counterparty Credit Exposure: A Technical Guide (Springer Finance)


2

Claudio Albanese has a paper on the topic of GPUs and CVA computations. Here is one of his papers: link to paper


1

This only produces an approximation. As per Gregory (page 256) However, adding a spread to a contract such as a swap, the problem is non-linear since the spread itself will have an impact on the CVA. The correct value should be calculated recursively (since the spread is risky too) until the risky MTM of the contract is zero. He points to a ...


1

The marginal CVA depends on every other trade in the netting set. This implies that adding a trade to the portfolio changes the marginal CVA of all the other existing trades in the portfolio. Why is that problem? Imagine you only charge the client for the marginal CVA of each new trade. Since adding a new trade changes the CVA allocated to previously ...


1

I believe netting sets are usually provided as inputs to the algorithm in most-cases. If you were to kind of "guess" netting sets given different trades (in general) data, you could start by grouping them by counterparty. I'm not a legal specialist but my understanding is that counterparty here is to be understood as "legal entity" or something like that, ...


1

The presence of a mandatory break in a swap contract should reduce the CVA charge. That's because the CVA calculation models the default probability* swap market value while the swap is alive, so the calculation stops at the break date. There is one caveat: if a bank has a history of "waiving" mandatory breaks (i.e. In practice they never get exercised ) ...


1

Well, you should use the spread as the default probability. For example, A CDS spread of 593 bp for five-year Brazilian debt means that default insurance for a notion al amount of USD 1 m costs USD 59,300 p.a. Consider a 1-year CDS contract and assume that the total premium is paid up front. Let S: CDS spread (premium), p: default probability, R: recovery ...


1

The rules relating to mark-to-market accounting have always been, in my opinion, ridiculous. Citigroup have to mark their liabilities to a fair value, and in this case, where it is their own debt, part of the pricing require that they consider the potential of their own default. The more likely it becomes, that the bank defaults the less the banks swaps is ...


1

As I see it, the term $\Pi_B(t, T)$ is the value of the derivatives already owned by the bank. So, it's not some price they need to pay but an asset on the balance sheet. This increase in asset value leads to a profit. Balance sheet Example Imagine the balance sheet of OTC Subsidiary with rating A: Assets | Liabilities -----------------...


1

The CVA charge in Basel iii reporting increases the capital required for OTC derivatives trading. Apart from CVA, there are DVA and FVA that are important. The adjustments might be unitary reffered to as XVA, as the principle is the same.


1

A methodology for estimating rating/ region/ sector proxies for ACVA calculations can be found here: http://www.nomura.com/resources/europe/pdfs/cva-cross-section.pdf Please let me know if you need anything to be clarified (caveat: I am one of the authors). The methodology assigns a CDS mark to counterparties that either have no CDS marks, or their marks are ...


1

Your reference says "This method derives implied CDS spreads for unobservable issuers through the interpolation or extrapolation of observable CDS. It is a factor model that constructs CDS spread surface as a function of credit rating and maturity." So this is for issuers which do not have any CDS contracts priced (there are no CDS spreads to bootstrap). I'...


1

There are quite a few methods to calculate default probabilities from CDS data. Simply you start at the shortest tenor, assume constant hazard rate. Then for the next tenor, you assume the previous hazard rate is still valid till the previous tenor, and the hazard rate between the previous tenor and new tenor is calibrated so that CDS PV matches the market ...


1

An IRS contract will state in detail what interest is payable to whom and when. The typical vanilla Xibor IRS at present has a CSA for daily-rebalanced cash accruing at OIS rates. So the coupons are fixed on Xibor, and between coupon payments the PV is collateralised with cash, rebalanced every day using OIS interest accrual. However, some old CSAs permit ...


1

This book is quite good as a starting point: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Counterparty-Credit-Risk-Challenge-Financial/dp/047068576X



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