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In my case, it really depends if you are using any software at all. I usually get my Discount Factors with a 15 decimals precision. So im always storing at least 15 digits for DF, and yields up to 7-8 as rhaskett said. For equities, i guess it's pretty much the same as for yields, or even less. Nevertheless i store any return, price or ratio with a 7-8 ...


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As background, Floating point precision is a way of storing numbers such that the precision is relative to the largest digit. For instance, the number $0.00123$ stored in fixed precision needs 6 digits of precision (3 zeros and the 3 non-zero numbers). However, this same number stored as floating point precision $1.23 \cdot 10^{-3}$ needs only 3 ...


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For any data that is not strictly tabular and unchanging in schema, you should rule out SQL solutions. Option pricing fits that description in my experience, because high-liquidity stocks, currencies, or bonds, will have a far bigger set of strikes and maturities than lower liquidity instruments. Thus in a relational database you will have to have columns ...



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