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3

As with everything else it is determined by competition: little or no competition => very high fees (or more correctly large bid-ask spreads). That is one reason why many IB try to develop new derivatives: they can be very profitable when no one else trades them yet. Then the cost comes down somewhat when competitors come in. Lack of transparency in pricing ...


0

Let \begin{align*} C(S, K, t) = SN(d_1) - e^{-rt}KN(d_2) \end{align*} denote the Black-Scholes call option price with initial asset value $S$, strike $K$, and maturity $t$. Note that \begin{align*} \frac{\partial C}{\partial S} = N(d_1). \end{align*} For the above barrier option, note that \begin{align*} E_0 &= V_0 N(d_1)-e^{-rt}KN(d_2) -\bigg[V_0 ...


1

You haven't written down your equations correctly. Ignoring discounting, the equations should be: C(70)-P(70)= -4 (not 66), from put-call parity. Also, C(70) + P(70)= 27; from these two we get C(70)= 11.5 and P(70)=15.5 Also P(60)-P(50)= 2.5 and P(70)-2P(60)+P(50)=0.2 from which P(70)-P(60)=2.7, hence P(60)=12.8 and P(50)=10.3 so now we know all the ...



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