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3

You can use refined methodologies but if you just need a rough estimation of liquidity, you can simply use an average of daily volume over N days. In practice, for equities, people tend to use N = 20 or 30. Once you have the average daily volume (say 100,000 shares), you compare it to your holding (say 50,000 shares) to determine the the size of your ...


2

You wrote: $$d[5] = (DJIR[5] - \mu) * Covariance$$ but you left out half of it (the inverse and the transposed vector on the right side). The correct formula is $$d[5] = (DJIR[5] - \mu)^2 / Var[DJIR]$$ The covariance "matrix" becomes the variance in a 1-dimensional case (in other words $x_i$ and $y_i$ are both equal to DJIR[i] in this case) and the "matrix ...


2

Yes, the greenshoe option, technically called overallotment option is described in the prospectus. Yes, in the event the greenshoe option is exercised by the underwriters, the company issues additional shares and receives additional proceeds. Essentially it is as though a small secondary offering took place.


1

I think one of the main liquidity measures is the one from Pastor and Stambaugh (2003). You can use it for both individual stocks or indexes. Just run the following intra-month regression with daily data: $r^e_{i,d+1,t} = \theta_{i,t}+\phi_{i,t}r_{i,d,t}+\gamma_{i,t}sign(r^e_{i,d,t}) \times v_{i,d,t}+\epsilon_{i,d+1,t}$. Where $r^e_{i,d+1,t}$ is the ...


1

I would consider Amihud (2002) as a good first approximation with that level of data.


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In a world of uncertainty no one knows what future profits will be (especially > 1 year from now). All we can do is estimate. Who should we ask? The company management has an incentive to give out estimates that may be too optimistic. If you ask the competitors they are probably too pessimistic. Fortunately we have a machine called the stock market which ...


1

I was just like you when I started out: I had learned a lot about machine learning (mainly neural networks and genetic algorithms/programming) and used it heavily. I also had learned about classic statistics but not nearly as much as about ML. The problem with ML is - as I see it today - that you are often taking a sledgehammer to crack a nut, meaning: ...



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