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12

That was the devaluation of the French franc on 8 August, 1969 (by 12.5% in terms of par value), decided by President Pompidou and his finance minister Giscard d'Estaing. In those days exchange rates were quasi-fixed but subject to periodic realignments (the so-called Bretton Woods system of exchange rates, which was replaced by today's floating rate system ...


11

The volatility in the indices long ago was similar in magnitude to what it is today. The problem you are seeing in your plots is one of compounding and scaling. Think of it this way- back in the mid 70's the magnitude of NASDAQ pricing was around \$100. Today it is on the order of \$4000, a change of 40x. In linear terms, a 1% change in the index today (\...


9

No - clearly you've not seen the licensing agreements the exchanges force you to sign (one way or the other). Generally such firms and individuals have greater utility from the money they'll make working with the data than risking going to jail. Market data is a 5bn / yr business. You're pushing the proverbial up-hill. Anyway, you can get financial index ...


9

You are not clear if you want the S&P500 index (SPY), OPRA Options or the Futures. Having spent a lot of time exploring vendors, here is a summary to help you (in alphabetical order): AlgoSeek.com : Intraday data back to 2007 for US Equities, Futures and Options. So you can get S&P 500 data. Intraday they have tick, 1 sec, 1 min and 5 min OHLC bars....


8

The fx market, contrary to most other asset classes is an almost entirely fragmented over-the-counter market, aside the very small number of fx futures that are trading at dismal liquidity levels. Therefore, you will not encounter a single serious liquidity provider that will take a stab at estimating total traded volume in any of the currency pairs. Having ...


6

None of the previous answers have mentioned the fact that Bloomberg supports an API with support for all the main languages (C, C++, Java, Python, Perl -- and even Node and Haskell support on GitHub), on all the relevant operating systems: Windows, Linux, OS X, Solaris. This includes support for tick data which is stored in a rolling window (ie from ...


6

Markit Pricing Data is a prime source for cds data (not free).


5

Both free and paid access to data sets conatianing company financial statement items is available from Quandl. The free data sets are sourced from the SEC based on compnay electronic filings and go back about five years. For example, you could obtain five years of MSFT's quarterly net income using the R call Quandl("RAYMOND/MSFT_NET_INCOME_Q") Lists of ...


4

Depends on your budget of course, but: Mergent offers a great service, expensive though. Six Financial Information offers good Corporate Actions service. (Personally, I would go with this one) Morning Star Interactive Data (very hard company to deal with, their legal would waste a lot of your time, but may still worth to get a quote) Also, consider how ...


4

I think storing in UTC format is good practice. Here couple ideas that may motivate someone to deviate from that: Some markets are subject to day light saving time shifts and thus it introduces additional computations to convert back and forth, having to keep track of the 2 times a year the shifts occur. Some only limit themselves to an individual market, ...


4

Correct explanation by Freddy. Retail investors and even most institutional investors don't have access to trading, bid, or ask volumes. The reason is that there is no centralized body who would aggregate data. Would it be possible to put it in place? Certainly, but the big fx players (handful of the really big banks) would suffer. Although not even the ...


4

(P) prefix : As a service to the market and typically at the request of an issuer, Moody's will assign a provisional rating when it is highly likely that the rating will become final after all documents are received, or an obligation is issued into the market. A provisional rating is denoted by placing a (P) in front of the rating. Such ratings may also be ...


4

PX_BID and PX_ASK are the static equivalents of BID and ASK, the latter two of which populate in "real time" (i.e. as they are dynamically updated). So the PX_BID and PX_ASK values are dependent upon when you pulled the data. Bloomberg's source depends on the asset in question and the exchange on which they are listed, but the data does come from the ...


4

The data has definitely not disappeared, it's a problem with your vendor. There has been a corporate action on 2014-02-27 and hence the strike prices have been adapted accordingly. According to Bloomberg bsym your P69 (composite ID BBG004L7P7L6) became P68.63, and P70 (BBG004L7P8C4) became P69.63.


4

I found US data here. While this data doesn't include correlations, these can be calculated relatively easily from this data.


3

From a note of P. Krugman (link): So no it is not. Why ? I would say 3 cause: First: Dynamics, saving rates are longterm figures. Offer and demand would be different for these products. Some time there is a lack of liquidity and a need of financement, so a huge demand in short term bonds. Second: bank margin, reserve policies, they have to earn some ...


3

In effect, you are wondering whether to price this option on risk-free probability distributions (B-S drift $r_f$), or real-world ones (B-S drift $\mu$, however calibrated) One cannot short the mutual fund, so the argument for using risk-free is weakened. But, there are various economic equilibrium arguments why using it may still be OK. If you use the ...


3

Here is what you can definitely use: Thomson Reuters Eikon


3

It depends obviously on which specific leverage you attempt to measure but you can certainly build some sort of index from, for example, the below: Aggregate smoothed equity P/E ratio divergence from long term mean (in a sense it reflects how money is levered to buy stocks at multiples of their long term P/E mean). Broad money in circulation -> Money ...


3

The stock was split into two share classes, the series that you might be looking for is under the ticker GOOGL.


3

Most hedges funds only allow monthly subscriptions and redemptions; which means they will only publish official prices on a monthly basis. If someone does publish daily data view it with suspicion. Having said that HFRX publish numbers on a daily basis.


3

As a short summary and adaption of the question: You better redefine $\hat{r}_i= \frac{S_{i-1}}{S_1}-1$ and $\hat{S}_i = (1+\hat{r}_i)S_0$. The above definition of $\hat{S}_i$ yields a sample of potential values for $S$ for the future day. This approach is usually applied in historical simulation. The aim here is to use information of the past about the ...


3

FREE SOURCES --> http://www.cmegroup.com/market-data/settlements/ http://www.cboe.com/data/Settlement.aspx Your best bet is going to each exchanges' website and downloading it directly from them. If not, you are going to have to find a data provider like a BBG or TR. I strongly recommend that you check out or get on a Bloomberg terminal, and type in ...


3

As you've mentioned, it depends on the trading venue and the exact market data product that you're subscribed to. Unless otherwise stated, the data is usually updated at every occurrence of an event (explains the irregualr intervals), and often, the data is not disseminated immediately and multiple events may be batched in a single message informing you of ...


3

This is an interesting topic. I assumed that you are looking for a public data source. Here is the margin data as reported by NYSE organizations (nyxdata) that offers a downloadable file. Here is the page of FINRA for Margin Statistics. This is an HTML page, I did not find a link to download a data file. You can validate the two sources against each other....


3

If you want to estimate volatility from historical data, the only best linear unbiased estimator (BLUE) is $$\sigma=\sqrt{\frac{1}{T-1}\sum_{i=1}^T (r_i-E(r_i))^2}$$ Any other estimator will hence either be biased or not consistent. Another approach could be to estimate volatility via a GARCH model, which has shown good empirical results in the past. It is ...


3

All option pricing formulas except this one and this one use some sort of historical volatility . I can't see how you can use the Black Sholes framework and not use some sort of historical volatility uses an order book uses geometric shapes and volume


3

As background, Floating point precision is a way of storing numbers such that the precision is relative to the largest digit. For instance, the number $0.00123$ stored in fixed precision needs 6 digits of precision (3 zeros and the 3 non-zero numbers). However, this same number stored as floating point precision $1.23 \cdot 10^{-3}$ needs only 3 ...


3

Complete intraday data history can be obtained through the Thomson Reuters DataScope Tick History (TRDTH) archive: http://thomsonreuters.com/tick-history You may ask them for a trial subscription.


3

There is a way to download Japanese stock data report OHLC/Volume directly from the Tokyo Stock Exchange. The only thing is: The report is in PDF format and involves some parsing, if you are willing to do some quantitative analysis. A hack, however, exists: Download the options/futures daily report. It's a nice CSV file, and it contains an underlying price ...



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