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Here is the logic: Think of your investment as doubling and doubling again, and doubling again, rather than as going up a thousand, and then another thousand, and then another thousand. In other words, everything about investing is proportional, and that is EXACTLY what semi-logarithmic chart is.


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I plotted my own long term stock market price chart, nearly half a century ago, using semi-logarithmic scale and adjusting for inflation. So, I figure that now people are half a century late, in figuring out the obvious. But, at least people are starting to ask questions.


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Does the link below help? It's free and has daily 3 month rates. https://fred.stlouisfed.org/search?st=Libor+3+month+daily


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CSI: Expensive, but the data is not bad (quality wise) SIX Financial (former Telekurs): Middle tier price-wise, OK data CRB: Terrible customer service, but reasonable pricing CQG (don't know about their pricing)


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Try Markit.com/RED a very reliable and accurate source


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You can check whether your university has an access to Reuters or Bloomberg or else databases. In case it doesn't have any try Yahoo


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Better than Markit, you can have a look at https://www.datagrapple.com/ (subscription is free). About 1000 CDS are covered. Daily end-of-day prices (mid of a best bid/offer order book) from Jan 2006 and continues on an ongoing basis. There are the charts you want starting 2006. I think you may also be able to subscribe to an intra-day livefeed if you want.


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You can use =BHP(....,) to download the historical data from Bloomberg...to download the latest data you can use BDP instead of BHP.



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