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1

A pithy way to put it is "implied volatility is the wrong number to put in the wrong formula to get the right price." That is, implied volatility is by definition the parameter $\sigma$ to plug into the Black-Scholes option pricing formula to get the market price of a vanilla option. This is called "volatility," but in reality it isn't the same as the ...


4

No. Implied volatility isn't a historical measure of standard deviation. Implied volatility is used to relate a market price to some model, be that Black-Scholes or something more sophisticated. Another way to phrase it, implied vol is that single vol input into a model, such that the model reproduces the market prices. Different models will have ...


3

Since American style options allow early exercise, put-call parity will not hold for American options (unless they are held to expiration). In practice, there is also a difference between calls and puts for European options as well. The full description is here: What causes the call and put volatility surface to differ?


3

First, as far as I can tell, you are not taking into account dividends. Second, If you simply take the forward price of the SPX @ $5.5\%$ which is what you are using, you get $1411 \cdot \text{exp}(0.055 \cdot 2.99) = 1663$. Given a strike of $1300$, the call should have an intrinsic value of $1663-1300= 363$. You have a price of $272$. The price is less ...


0

First of all, a Bermudan Swaption does not have to be of American type. Consider a "9NC2 Bermudan" (9 non call 2), basically a Bermudan swaption with final maturity in 9 years which is not exercisable for the first 2 years. I have not worked at an exotic rates desk in a while (many years to be more precise) but from what I remember you need to use a ...


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This is pretty straight forward: The market prices vanilla options via implied volatility. You can like it or not like it but that is the way it is. So, the fair price of the option is the equivalent of the implied vol via BS. Now, if you believe the true price of an option should be different from the traded market price and you figure out that you have ...



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