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The bank in which you deposit your capital doesn't create the money to pay your interest; it earns it by lending to someone who can make good use of the money. The textbook example is a farmer who borrows £1000 to spend on fertiliser, gains £1200 in extra crop, and repays the bank £1000 plus £100 in interest. The bank gives you £50 for the use of your money, ...


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I think that you have to distinguish between a 'fiat' (modern) monetary system and a 'gold standard' one. But sustainability will always be ensured endogenously, one way or another. Fiat money is created whenever a loan is made, and the \$50 you describe will be created endogenously in the economy. Advocates would call it a virtous rather than a vicious ...


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The interest does not necessarily come from another loan. The ECB is paying interest to banks which is essentially to create ("print") new money. It is a fact, that the money supply is constantly growing over time, which in a simple model would just equal the interest paid out on loans. That does not necessarily have something to do with the economy being ...


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Some models do use ln(r_t), like Black–Derman–Toy and the Black–Karasinski models. Mainly to avoid negative interest rates in low rates / high volatility environments through the use of the log-normal distribution. Negative rates can wreak havoc in option premiums for example. They are interest rates indeed, that we call short rates, not yield on ...


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These are not yield. They are instantaneous short rates which are not directly observable in the market.


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1) JPY yield curve is currently upward sloping, not inverted... 2) Empirically, an upward sloping yield curve predicts recessions, not an inverted one. See this famous paper http://newyorkfed.org/research/current_issues/ci2-7.pdf



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