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5

The short answer is that Libor swap rates come from the market. They represent a series of cashflows in the future whose value is determined by the fixing, which the market participants have their own valuations of. Since the actual cash flows are now discounted using a separate funding curve, the swap prices embed both a prediction of future fixings and a ...


5

First point to consider : some banks are by nature "positive" in their account to the central banks , for instance classical saving banks tend to get more deposit than loans; conversely others are more engage in loans activity (investments banks..) and are by "nature" borrowers on Interbank markets. Secondly (the point you underestimate), mandatory ...


4

It depends a little what you mean by "current" but the CDS market developed a "standardized model" for transforming between upfront and spread-based quotes. The model depends on an agreed curve of risk-free rates. The LIBOR rates used for CDS settlement are available at: https://www.markit.com/news/InterestRates_CCY_yyyymmdd.zip This is not up-to-the ...


3

Regarding swaps, the current preferred fixings for IRS in various currencies are given below. As with all OTC instruments, you're free to use whatever you like when you agree a deal, though most banks will stick to particular fixings. Ccy Dom Int Alt Int AUD BBSW BBSW LIBOR CAD CDOR CHF LIBOR CZK PRIBOR DKK CIBOR EUR ...


3

The reference rate used in Australia is the Bank Bill Swap Rate. According to Investopedia "The bank bill interest rate is the wholesale interbank rate within Australia and is published by the Australian Financial Markets Association (AFMA). It is the borrowing rate among the country's top market makers, and is widely used as the benchmark interest rate for ...


3

The main problem is that you cannot achieve Libor in the markets. So the old-fashioned method of discounting at Libor doesn't work any more. As an example, if you compound up the 3m Libor with today's price on a 3x6 FRA, you won't get 6m Libor. Traditionally, that would mean arbitrage, but these days it's just a fact of life. You cannot achieve 3m Libor for ...


2

"Capital requirements" is a misnomer as a minimum quota is not being placed on liabilities thus equities but on assets. Banks are required by most national laws to hold a portion of assets "in reserve", cash or deposits at the banknote issuer, a central bank. A reason why one bank might have a deficit of reserves is because it has met with withdrawals in ...


2

The interbank rate probably isn't reasonable given your second example. However, between the constant capital flows going back and forth between thousands of banks on a daily basis and the asymmetric nature of the banking model, it's difficult and unrealistic to determine a fair market rate between the two parties. As far as I'm concerned, bank A got the ...


2

Here are your Australian LIBOR rates: http://www.homefinance.nl/english/international-interest-rates/libor/libor-interest-rates-aud.asp Couple points in addition: Every major financial market has an established rates market at which banks are borrowing and lending among themselves. In fact such transactions are performed every single day in order to ...


2

I think to have the answer: use qlBondPreviousCashFlowDate() pointing at your FloatingRateBond object to get the last date of payment; use qlInterestRateIndexFixingDate() to get the fixing date referring to the last payment date; use qlIndexAddFixings() to add a fixing rate to the fixing date you got above; repeat for each one of your bonds if they share ...


1

If a bank lends 6m Libor and finances it by borrowing 3m Libor and borrowing forward 3x6 libor, this is not arbitrage, as the bank is assuming 6m credit risk whilst his financing is 3m credit risk. (There are also other factors like regulatory capital, tying up balance sheet for 6m, etc.) So the text book case where the 3x6 FRA (or front Eurodollar) is equal ...



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