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The general effect of quantitative analysis of the markets is to enforce randomness. Suppose a strategic quant finds a predictable pattern where a stock always rises on Tuesdays. His institution will commence buying the stock every Monday, and selling on Tuesday. The trading itself pushes the stock price up on Monday and down on Tuesday (in general), so if ...


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You should make your borrow cost sufficient to dissuade unlimited short selling. In practice, each short would require you to borrow shares from your broker. This is usually handled when computing transaction cost. You should account for this in your trading algorithm or in the factor model itself. A simple method would make shorts some N% more expensive ...


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it's difficult to say that they are not popular. Some people definitely use them for live pricing. I'd say the real question is "why are they not popular in the academic literature"? One answer would simply be that most the questions that arise in their use are ones of fiddliness which do not make good papers.


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EDIT: I changed the answer to have it more on topic. Summary It boils down to Mark Joshi's answer. I wanted to add something more. Answer A probability measure $Q1$ and a numeraire $N1(t)$ are associated if all prices expressed relative to $N1$ are martingales under $Q1$: $$\frac{price(t)}{N1(t)} = \mathbb{E}^{Q1} \left[ \left. \frac{price(T)}{N1(T)} \, ...


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Different measures have different properties. Using a particular measure may make it easy to derive an analytic formula since a rate is driftless. When performing Monte Carlo, the sign of the drifts changes with measure which affects convergence. There is also the problem in the terminal measure that the numeraire can get very small and so some paths can ...



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