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3

Since the volatility is not changing, we can assume that the only change is the underlying asset price $S$. Then \begin{align*} C(S+\Delta) &\approx C(S) + Delta \times\Delta +\frac{1}{2} Gamma \times \Delta^2 \\ &=11.50 + 0.58 \times 0.5 + \frac{1}{2}\times 2 \times (0.5)^2\\ &=12.04. \end{align*}


3

you just add in any auxiliary variables accumulated along the path that determine the pay-off to the regression variables. So path-dependence is not a problem. If you have previous decisions, you may need to do different regressions based on their possible values or make them into a continuous variables that can be used for regression.


2

As your code works for the short maturity case, I assume that it is correct. The volatility of $80 \%$ is simply huge. Thus the area covered by the paths is huge too. As you can read e.g. here the sampling error is proportional to the variance of the process, which is huge in your case. As a brute force solution you can just enlarge the number of samples. ...


2

As barrycarter stated in the comment - the value of a set of [European!] options is the sum of the values of the individual options. This is simply follows from integral of a sum being a sum of integrals. $$butterfly\,option\,price = \\ \int_0^\infty butterfly\,payoff(S) dS = \\ \int_0^\infty (call\,payoff(S,K)+call\,payoff(S,K')+call\,payoff(S,K'')) dS ...


2

The easiest way to think of this is as follows: Settlement Price - Price at which the exchange margins all accounts for those options. Closing Price - Mid/Bid/Ask of Active Market at the exchanges last trade time. E.g. for TY Contracts this is at 5pm EST vs. a Settle Time of 3pm EST. Last Trade Price - Not all options trade every day. This is the price ...


1

We consider the forward value, which can be employed to estimate the equity value. Let $T_1=0.5$ be the dividend payment time, and $T=1$. Moreover, let $r_1=5\,\%$ be the annualized interest rate to $T_1$, $r=6\,\%$ be the interest rate to $T$, and $d=5$ be the dividend payment. Then, the forward value, under the risk-neutral measure with the deterministic ...


1

The relationship between interest rates and equity prices being at best unstable and weak, I'll assume that the level of interest rate is irrelevant here. So the answer to your question (price of the equity in a year) is 95, everything else being equal. Of course it's unlikely that the equity will actually price at 95 in a year due to market movements, but ...



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