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4

I have heard of several allegations in the recent days, but they are mostly baseless. However, there are a rare, few trading venues whose matching rules are most often accused of giving unfair order execution advantages to certain firms. These usually arise from violations of the standard price-time priority: IEX's broker priority rule. "All orders will ...


4

Think of it like a forward trade on the settlement price. If you are buying with a TAS you are agreeing to go long the futures contract at the settlement price (+/- the offset), and whoever you trade with is agreeing to go short at the same price. It is guaranteed because the exchange becomes the counterparty for both traders and there is a margin deposit. ...


3

With respect to what you need, you have to consider different aspects of optimal trading: the Almgren-Chriss framework (cited by Anna, since Jim and Alex -amongst others- extended it) focus on obtaining an optimal trading rate, it is nice but not really what you need. You can nevertheless use it to plan / schedule your trading during the day. but what you ...


3

In the paper Optimal split of orders across liquidity pools: a stochastic algorithm approach (2011) we present the theoretical aspect of liquidity seeking, thus you will learn how they work. There is a seminal (once again) white paper by Robert Almgren on iceberg chasing that is very informative too.


3

Look into OLF's Findur http://www.olf.com/software/financial-capital.html highly customizable trading platform, will not give you everything you mentioned out of the gate but has capability to get there with some development effort


2

In addition to @madilyn's answer, there is one point that needs to be addressed and that is often called an unfair advantage although it is merely a competitive advantage. Take the US Equities market. There are now several venues on which the same symbols are traded. If one HFT acquires information about one symbol in one venue - e.g. due to a limit order ...


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Here is how I would approach such a calibration. Assuming we have the necessary market data one can easily construct the emprical distribution of the arrival rate. Let $\lambda_{emp}(\delta)$ be the empirical distribution. Then one can define a metric by $$ m(k,A,N)=\sum_{i=1}^N |\lambda_{emp}(i)-\lambda^a(i)| $$ After you have decided upon a suitable ...


1

I guess this remark refers mainly to "penny stocks". In the US (it is not true in Europe where crossing is far more regulated) it may be possible to choose to cross at any point inside the bid-ask spread. It means that if it is closer to the bid than to the ask, it will advantage the buyer. In Sub Penny Trading in US Equity Markets (by Romain Delassus, ...



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