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It will bring diversification benefits to your portfolio. Mean and standard deviation alone only measures the first two moments of the individual asset returns, with no regards for their joint distribution and correlation structure. Assuming the mean and volatility measurements are the same for $2$ assets with correlation $corr<1$, then combining them ...


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Others may have different views, but I've tried applying Kelly formula/fractional Kelly strategies to capital allocation, and find it rather unpractical and risky. I would honestly suggest a three-tier optimization framework that I am myself adopting: Assuming you have $M$ number of models covering multiple instruments and strategies. Your goal is to pick ...


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Bayesian Odds Ratios can be used to compare models and allocate wealth to various models based on the relative probability that each particular model is "best." You could begin to look into it more on the wiki site.


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Have a look at my paper http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2259133 I checked Kelly formula and found the answer from it is exactly as Markowitz's theory. >Thus, most issues on mean-variance theory (e.g. noise of estimation for mean and >variance) applies here. Kelly is not exactly as Markowitz's theory but they are indeed closely ...


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Initial capital is not a real constraint in theoretical analysis, but might be a practical constraint in reality. The objective function you gave defines the efficient frontier corresponding to a given risk tolerance $q \in [0, \infty]$: $$\min\{w^T\Sigma w-qR^Tw\}$$ This criterion is among the other popular optimization criteria, such as minimum variance, ...


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See for some answers on this: http://www.stoxx.com/download/articles/article_minvar_201408.pdf


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The technique is sometimes referred to as full information maximum likelihood. It is more general than the technique you describe, but it is similar. Basically you start with the data with the longest horizon and get the covariance matrix, then for the data with the next longest horizon you regress them against the data with the longest horizon, finally you ...


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If you are investing an amount $M$, split over deals indexed by $i$ and with a weight $w_i$, then your dollar position in each share will be $w_i M$. The exposure to the index will be $\sum \beta_i w_i M$ You should realize that this will not hedge idiosyncratic risks. In general, the more deals you have, the better this type of hedge should work (assuming ...


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I think u can hedge using the description given in JC hull.. here he uses index futures. A detailed explanation is given for one stock. I think u can extend it to a portfolio. Also one can hedge by combining two or three stock indices. See page 33 in this link http://www2.fiu.edu/~dupoyetb/Financial_Risk_Mgt/lectures/Ch03.pdf



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