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I would say the financial- and the art market is very different, only the roots of the market / auctions is the same. As the art market is unique and very illiquid, alot of the strategies from the modern financial market simply does not apply. I have been building (and still maintains) a toolbox of models, which mostly try to find trends based on multiple ...


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Art markets typically have huge transaction costs of the order of 10%, caused by buyers premium and auction fees. Therefore long holding periods are unavoidable, with long-term returns somewhere between those of bonds and equities. By its very nature, art is not easily replicated so arbitrage or derivatives are out. The rationality of agents (aka collectors) ...


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On exchanges, there is such orderbook with sufficient amount of limitorders, so when you place an order (market or limit), the "best" limitorders for you will be hitted and change the price last traded price. The price you see is actually just the midpoint between the currently best available bid and ask prices in the orderbook. Therefore, this price might ...


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price went from \$200 to \$202, this is "one percent change", because $\frac{\$2}{\$200}100=1$


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The state price vector are the prices of securities which pay \$1 if and only if that state of the world occurs. This is just a question of being able to replicate the payoffs $$ \begin{pmatrix} 1 \\ 0 \\ 0 \end{pmatrix}, \begin{pmatrix} 0 \\ 1 \\ 0 \end{pmatrix}, \begin{pmatrix} 0 \\ 0 \\ 1 \end{pmatrix} $$ with payoff vectors $\vec{b} = [1,1,1]^T$ and ...


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In the academic literature it is extremely widely applied in the last 20 years. I would estimate maybe 200 empirical papers, or more. For example a common finding is that higher frequency (daily) wavelet correlations have been high since 2007, attributable either to increasing financial interation or the financial crisis. It is also popular to estimate the ...


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Usually stockreturns $R$ are assumed normally distributed. If market goes up 1%, the expected stockreturn is $R=\beta\cdot0.01=0.02$ (since $\beta$ being the senstivity to market). Stockprice from $100$ over $103$ requires at least $103/100-1=0.03$ return $R$. As we have now from the question $\sigma=0.02$ and $\mu=0.02$, with $R\sim N(\mu,\sigma)$ we ...



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