Hot answers tagged

15

My deal is HFT so what I care about is read/load data from file or DB quickly in memory perform very efficient data-munging operations (group,transform) visualize easily the data I think is is pretty clear that 3. goes to R, graphics and ggplot2 and others allow you to plot anything from scratch with little effort. About 1. and 2. I am amazed reading ...


13

I've used both R and Python with Pandas in a professional quantitative financial work to do both large and small scale projects. I would strongly recommend Python with Pandas over R for most new projects in the field especially in time series analysis. While I don't dispute vonjd in that you will find more libraries in R with algorithms on the bleeding ...


13

This is interesting because I see another trend: Matlab is being replaced by R, but I guess this is another story. I use R for my academic (I am also teaching this stuff) as well as my consulting work (I am mainly working in the $\mathbb{P}$ area, with some excursions into $\mathbb{Q}$). I tried Python but it didn't work for me. I think the main reasons I ...


9

Instead of wild guesses about R's/python's future in the community, here some facts: The following query on StackExchange Data Explorer counts the number of questions that have <r> or <python> tags. If you scroll down on one of the three webpages provided below, you can see a graph with data on a monthly basis. You can easily run this query on ...


8

For data analysis, particularly for large data analysis project, pretty much most of the top quant hedge funds and a lot of the banks are using Python (over R) for a couple of reasons but many still have bits and pieces of R for specific packages or functions (I work at a bank and interface with quite a few quant hedge funds on data analysis): Earlier ...


5

It doesn't matter if you use *100 or just pct_change, as long as you are consistent. However, in practice, due to underlying floating point numerical instabilities in the underlying optimization algorithms/default tolerances used in scipy/arch, having the returns expressed in %, i.e. multiplied by 100, will have a better chance of converging during the ...


4

For the tasks listed, both Python and R perform very well. There are some packages in Python not in R and vice versa. My solution for this is to simply call R from Python. This allows for the best of both worlds. It is also important to note I do not write any R code other than calling an R library from Python. Calling Python from R does not work equally ...


4

This does the trick. Given "U8", function will get the IMM date for Sep 2018. Given "U4", function gets the IMM date for Sep 2024 (or it will until we've passed that date). Could be easily modified to also pull historical IMMs from a given longer symbol eg. "U2014". def getIMMDate(IMMcode): '''Takes 2 digit IMM code and returns effective date as datetime ...


3

What you need is more mutual information rather than Shannon entropy. It is dedicated to capture the influence of one variable on another (you can think about it as a non linear version of Pearson correlations). They are closely related since the mutual information $I$ between two variables $X$ and $Y$ reads: $$I(X;Y) = H(X,Y) - H(X|Y) - H(Y|X)$$ where $H$ ...


3

OpenTSDB is good for large-scale time series storage. metrilyx/opentsdb-pandas and wiktorski/opentsdb_pandas seems to provide the interface with pandas. OpenTSDB and HBase rough performance test | MoreDevs provides a benchmark, may not exactly match your requirements but you can try.


2

I calculate duration in Python using numpy, it's nice and simple: def durations(cfs, rates, price, ytm, no_coupons): import numpy as np mac_dur = np.sum([cfs[i]*i/np.power(1+rates[i],i) for i in range(len(cfs))])/price mod_dur = mac_dur/(1+ytm/no_coupons) return mac_dur, mod_dur


2

def bbands(price, length=30, numsd=2): """ returns average, upper band, and lower band""" ave = pd.stats.moments.rolling_mean(price,length) sd = pd.stats.moments.rolling_std(price,length) upband = ave + (sd*numsd) dnband = ave - (sd*numsd) return np.round(ave,3), np.round(upband,3), np.round(dnband,3) sp['ave'], sp['upper'], ...


2

Both R and Python can do this very nicely. For Python you would need the pandas package and its dependencies. pandas has a lot of basic statistics, but for more advanced statistics like it looks like you want to do, you can use the statsmodels package, which can work directly with pandas data types. It can also download the csv files directly off the ...


2

There is a module called visualize-wealth that provides: Documentation auto-generation capability with sphinx Portfolio construction methodologies in 3 ways (trade blotter, weight allocation frame, and static allocation series) All basic statistical measures, including many sophisticated ones such as CVaR, Mean Absolute Tracking Error, Cornish Fisher ...


2

The major advantage of Python (w/ pandas) over R is that Python supports OOP (object-oriented programming). It makes sense to organize a large code base using a hierarchy of classes. Python also supports the notion of polymorphism so that we can use well-known design patterns (e.g., Strategy, Observer, etc.) in our code.


2

You can get this using a pandas rolling_max to find the past maximum in a window to calculate the current day's drawdown, then use a rolling_min to determine the maximum drawdown that has been experienced. Lets say we wanted the moving 1-year (252 trading day) maximum drawdown experienced by a particular symbol. The following should do the trick: import ...


2

The code below pulls AAPL time series from Yahoo Finance, computes mean/std and simulates 100 paths that are 20 days long. Input: import pandas as pd import numpy as np from numpy.random import normal # bring data ticker = 'AAPL' url = 'http://real-chart.finance.yahoo.com/table.csv?s=%s' % ticker data = pd.read_csv(url, index_col='Date', parse_dates=True) ...


2

It is all in the code:: Rcpp::List rl = Rcpp::List::create(Rcpp::Named("value") = opt.NPV(), Rcpp::Named("delta") = opt.delta(), Rcpp::Named("gamma") = opt.gamma(), Rcpp::Named("vega") = (excType=="european") ? opt.vega() : R_NaN, ...


2

PYTHON I have found this class from the statsmodels library for calculating Garch models. Unfortunately, I have not seen MGARCH class/library. Below you can see the basic information about the garch models in mentioned class from the statsmodels. Probably you have to implement it by your own in python, so this class might be used as a starting point. ...


2

There is a times series DBMS (InfiniFlux) that can be easily used with Python. The database is not open source but it does provide a free version for evaluation, too. So you can try whether the DBMS is suitable for your project. You are asking 2M rows should be processed in less than 30 seconds, InfiniFlux can store and retrieve more than 500,000 data ...


2

They expire 30 days before the expiration of the S&P monthly options. The latter usually expire on the third Friday of the month (however, in rare cases the S&P opts. expire on Thursday because the Friday is a holiday; the last time it happened was April 17, 2014 since April 18 2014 was a NYSE holiday). Neglecting the holiday thing, the expiration ...


1

I'm guessing your best bet would be to get setup with an SFTP account with Bloomberg. Just contact your rep to get the ball rolling. We upload 10's of protfolio's 10's of times a day. I don't think there is an actual api for pulling data from PRTU as I'm not sure exaclty what you'd pull other than the last upload time.


1

In Python, simple geometric returns: import numpy as np import pandas as pd sp500 = pd.io.data.DataReader('^GSPC', 'yahoo')['Close'] simple_ret = sp500.pct_change() (1+simple_ret).cumprod()[-1] -1 0.74751768460019963 Log-returns: log_ret = np.log(1+simple_ret) np.exp(log_ret.cumsum()[-1]) -1 0.74751768460020074 In ...


1

When doing series like this in Python, I usually just add 1 to each return, then multiply across these sums for cumulative returns. Such as, if my returns over three days were -5.2%, 2.1% & 4.8%, then the values I would store would be: 1 + (-0.052) = 0.948 1 + (0.021) = 1.021 1 + (0.048) = 1.048 Then, to calculate my cumulative returns, I ...


1

highOutput = [] lowOutput = [] lsth = [None]*window lstl = [None]*window for i in range(0, len(highValue)): maxValue=0 lsth.append(highValue[i]) lsth = lsth[-window:] for j in range(0, len(lsth)): if lsth[j] > maxValue: maxValue = lsth[j] highOutput.append(maxValue) for i in range(0, len(lowValue)): ...


1

Native support is very limited. TradeStation's WebAPI pretty much works with any language because it is wrapped in HTTP calls using RESTful. If a platform has an API that supports std C/C++ interfaces, you can write a wrapper to extend the API to python. Search for "Calling C from Python". It is more work to code, but otherwise your choices are very ...


1

True this is a stackoverflow question but have you tried the fool around with the package Pandas? You can do in Python import pandas as pd data = pd.read_csv('filepath/file.csv') That's the easiest way.


1

You need to use a groupby, timegrouper, and its annual option, and take the first value in each group. For example, if I grab yahoo data: import pandas as pd import pandas.io.data as web # Grab S&P 500 data going back to beginning of 2011 SPY_Dat = web.DataReader('SPY', 'yahoo', datetime.date(2011,1,1), end) # Convert to annual data: SPY_Ann_Dat = ...


1

Just checked in my python script for daily futures data from Interactive Brokers. Maybe it will be useful for you: https://github.com/busygin/ib_data_loader


1

The IB API calls your code asynchronously when there are account updates after you have called reqAccountUpdates. But you have to provide a callback function (handler) for the IB API to call. Looks like from the [ibPy documentation example] (https://code.google.com/p/ibpy/wiki/IbPyOptional) and how the Java IB API is defined, you want to call ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible