Tag Info

New answers tagged

6

A quick google search retrieves the syllabus for the Stanford STATS 242 class. You can find it here. Just in case it's taken down at some point I'll copy-paste the source material. Keep in mind that I have no idea if this material is good or bad -- I didn't make this list. Also keep in mind that it contains treatments of what does and does not work. With ...


0

OK one thing that comes to my mind is the standard trick to reformulate constraints like $|x_i|<=c$ (limiting exposure of $x_i$ while still allowing negative weights). Notice, that $|x_i| \leq c$ is not a linear constraint, so the solver wont work in this case. A little trick can help: You split up the variables into positive and negative parts: ...


2

If you have a vector of weights $w=(w_1,\ldots,w_n)^T$ then $(1,\ldots,1)* w = \sum_{i=1}^n w_i$ thus a sum condtion can be formulated by multiplication with a row of ones. A $\le$ can be put into an $\ge$ by multiplying with $(-1)$ and if you have to put all your constraints into on $A$ then you usually stack all the row vectors together. In your case the ...


1

I agree with the previous statement that this is more stats related than anything else (it's not quant finance). But it's still a great question! This sounds awfully similar to linear regression testing with multiple predictor variables; you're basically doing it in a "monte carlo" fashion :) Depending on how your data is formatted, you could enter it into ...



Top 50 recent answers are included