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I would like to point out a recent paper by Lewellen, Nagel and Shaken which has changed a little bit the way factor models are tested. The standard procedure was to run time series regression of a factor model on Fama&French 25 size and BE/ME sorted portfolios to obtain factor loadings, and then cross sectional regressions using $R^2$ as a good measure ...


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For calculating the AIC for factor models, I calculate the likelihood based on the multivariate distribution of the factor model. I try to make any assumptions as explicit as possible. Bayesians typically do not use the (so-called) BIC. WAIC (Watanabe-Akaike Information Criteria) is becoming more common among Bayesians. When thinking about the AIC, you ...


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Use your total wealth allocated to the trades as denominator. Total wealth allocated would include all collateral. In this way you (or your broker) make sure that the denominator is always positive. Presumably this would also reflect what you really want to track. The only problem that remains is what amount of your wealth needs to be allocated. But this is ...


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My suggestion would be to use the actual (leveraged) position value, rather than the cost you paid to open the position. Then if you want, you can multiply the return on the position by your leverage, so you might see something like this (if I understood your question correctly): Date PnL Begin End Return 4-Dec -30 4000 3970 ...


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It may not be possible to compute returns solely on yields. However, @Oleg has information on maturity (long term bonds, 20-30 years to maturity), and the YTM gives us a coupon for an "on the run" bond. As a proxy for this bond group, you could use a bond with 25 years left to maturity with an annual coupon of 7.44, where today was the coupon date, and the ...


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You can calculate an approximation. Yields are quoted on an annual basis. Bond valuations are based on Discounted Cash Flow formulas. Let’s take your sample data: weekly yields of 7.44, 7.43 and 7.40. $100 invested for a year at a yield of 7.44% will be worth 107.44 at the end of a year. That is 100 x (1.0744 ^ ( 365 / 365 )) = 107.44. The rate of ...


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Unfortunately I don't think it's possible to compute returns purely based on yields... There are a few options: If you're on the buy side, you can easily get access to Barclay, Citi, or BofA's bond indices. These are very high quality datasets for studying historical bond returns. If you have Bloomberg, they've started providing bond indices as well. They ...



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