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The second theorem called "Girsanov II" is indeed a special case of the general "Girsanov I" from above with $$Y_t=W_t,$$$$X_t=-\int_0^t\Theta_udW_u$$. We can show that $$[Y,X]=-\int_0^t\Theta_udu$$ using general Stochastic Calculus rules (e.g. see p.37, 6.6 here): $$[Y,X]=[W_t,-\int_0^t\Theta_udW_u]=-\int_0^t\Theta_ud[W_u,W_u]=-\int_0^t\Theta_udu$$ since ...


2

You have $$\widetilde{W}_t=W_t+\int\Theta(u)du$$ which is in general not a Brownian motion, because it has a drift component. But 5.3.1 states $$M_t=M_0+\int \Gamma(u)dW_u\tag{5.3.1}$$ , which holds only for a Brownian motion $W$ (and $M_t$ martingale). So one cannot trivially replace $W_t$ and $W_t+\int\Theta(u)du=\widetilde{W}_t$ in 5.3.2 aswell by ...


1

First of all, a filtration $( \mathscr{F}_t )_{t \geq 0 }$ is a "set" of sigma algebras indexed usually by time t that are increasing. That is, for every $t>0$, $\mathscr{F}_t$ is a sigma algebra and $\mathscr{F}_t \subseteq \mathscr{F}_T$ for all $0\leq t \leq T$. The canonical example, is the filtration generated by a process, say Brownian Motion $W$: ...



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