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8

I can clarify 100% that $(dw)^2$= $dt$ and recommend you to accept it as a fact. Like any other differential, this differential is defined in terms of its integral: $$ \int_{t_{0}}^{t_{1}}(dW)^{2}\equiv\lim_{n\rightarrow\infty}\sum_{k=0}^{n-1}[W(t_{k+1})-W(t_{k})]^{2} $$ Where $t_{k}=t_{0}+k(t_{1}-t_{0})/n$. Since $$ ...


7

We know that $(\tilde{W}_t) := (-W_t)$ is also a Wiener process so $$ E[W_pW_qW_r] = E[\tilde{W}_p\tilde{W}_q\tilde{W}_r] = (-1)^3E[W_pW_qW_r] $$ and that implies that $E[W_pW_qW_r] = 0$.


6

You derivation here is flawed because you are deriving with respect to two processes and you do not take into account that the variable $W_t$ is stochastic and hence $S_t$ is as well. So, to derive $S_t$ from $dS_t$, you have to apply Ito's Lemma, see this question for details. This is the "classic" way you see it. If you want to do it the other way ...


6

The trick is to start with the highest power, rewrite it as something you know (a third order moment) and then work backwards on the remaining terms. By that I mean you can complete the cube as follows: $$E[W_t^3 - 3tW_t|\mathcal{F}_s] = E[(W_t-W_s)^3 - C -3tW_t|\mathcal{F}_s]$$ where you'll need to find $C$ such that the equality holds (i.e. $C=W_s^3 + ...


6

Shreve's theorem also called "Girsanov II" indeed represents a special case of the general "Girsanov I" from Wiki above, with $$Y_t:=W_t,$$$$X_t:=-\int_0^t\Theta_udW_u$$ We can show: $$[Y,X]=-\int_0^t\Theta_udu$$ by using general Stochastic Calculus rules (e.g. p.37, 6.6 here): ...


6

In the integral $$\int_0^t S_u dW^{*}_u \, ,$$ $dW^{*}_u \equiv W^{*}_{u+du} - W^{*}_u$ is independent from the integrand $S_u$. So, $\mathbb{E}\left[ \int_0^t S_u dW^{*}_u\middle\vert \mathcal{F}_0\right] = \int_0^t \mathbb{E}\left[S_u \middle\vert \mathcal{F}_0\right]\mathbb{E}\left[dW^{*}_u\middle\vert \mathcal{F}_0\right] = 0$, since ...


6

It's a lemma! Ito's Lemma gives the change of coordinates rule for stochastic calculus. The multiplication rule is a shorthand way of expressing it.


5

For any $s \geq t$, note that \begin{align*} r_s = r_t + \sigma\int_t^s dW_u + \int_t^s \theta_u du. \end{align*} Then, \begin{align*} \int_t^T r_s ds &= (T-t)r_t + \sigma\int_t^T\int_t^s dW_u ds + \int_t^T \int_t^s\theta_u du ds\\ &=(T-t)r_t + \sigma\int_t^T\int_u^T ds\, dW_u +\int_t^T\int_u^T\theta_u ds du\\ &=(T-t)r_t + \sigma\int_t^T ...


5

The problem is equivalent to given to 2 independent standard normals $W$ and $Z$ the probability of $$ W > 0, \text{ and } W+Z<0. $$ or $$ W > 0, \text{ and } Z<-W. $$ Plotting this set we see it is the bottom half of the lower right quadrant. The probability of being in the lower right quadrant is clearly $0.25$ by symmetry. The probability ...


4

I thought this was an interesting example to add. It concerns a "ratio model" of habit (as opposed to a "difference" model of habit). See, for example, Abel (1990, American Economic Review). Let $$ x_t = \lambda \int_{-\infty}^t e^{-\lambda(t-s)} c_s ds. $$ (For context, $x_t$ is a log habit index that is given by a geometric average of past consumption, ...


4

B1~N(0,1) and B2=B1+Z, for Z~N(0,1). From that E(B1*B1)=E(B1*B2)=1, E(B2*B2)=2. Therefore they are bivariate Gaussian with covariance matrix (1,1;1,2) therefore probability is around 12%, which is the volume over the bottom-right quadrant.


4

Maybe I'm missing something? Given $f:\mathbb{R}^n \rightarrow \mathbb{R}^m$, you can write $f = (f_1,\ldots,f_m)$, where each $f_i:\mathbb{R}^n \rightarrow \mathbb{R}$. Apply Ito to each $f_i$ separately.


4

In this case it is just the notion that your payoff function should not explode at some point - made mathematically rigorous. Have a look at the following picture from wikipedia: Intuitively the Lipschitz condition (or Lipschitz continuity) ensures that your payoff function always remains entirely outside the white cone, so it cannot e.g. become ...


3

The logic from Bob Jansen is correct. The problem is abuse of ideas and notation the integral symbol from the deterministic world gets sloppily applied to random variables. Unlike normal $dt$, which is always positive, $dW_t$ can go 'backwards'. Thus increments of terms like $W_t dW_t$ have a first element that goes up and down with the second element ...


3

A portfolio $V_t(\alpha_t,\beta_t)$ (for stock $S_t$ and zerobond $B_t$) is self-financing iff: $$V_t=\alpha_tS_t+\beta_t B_t$$ It further implies $$dV_t=\alpha_tdS_t+\beta_tdB_t$$ To replicate a derivative $C(S_t,t)$ by a self-financing portfolio of stock and bond, set: $$dV_t=dC_t$$ The dynamics of $dC$ can be specified using Ito's Lemma on ...


3

I am not sure if I understood your question correctly but I will try to answer it anyway. If you have a standard normal random vector $z \sim N(\mathbb{0},I_n)$ (where $z,0 \in \mathbb{R}^{n\times1}$ and $I_n \in \mathbb{R}^{n\times n}$ is the identity matrix) and you want to transform it into a multivariate normal $x \sim N(\mu,\Sigma)$ you do it the ...


3

What you need is to identify the distribution of the asset price $S_T$, conditional on the information set $\mathcal{F}_{t}$ at time $t$, for $0\leq t < T$. Note that \begin{align*} S_T &= S_t \exp\bigg(\int_{t}^T \Big(r_s-\frac{\sigma_s^2}{2}\Big)ds + \int_t^T\sigma_s dW_s \bigg). \end{align*} Let \begin{align*} P(t, T) = \exp\bigg(-\int_t^T r_s ds ...


3

Formally, this is a shorthand for the quadratic variation. For a more rudimentary definition, $\langle W, W\rangle$ is a process such that $W^2-\langle W, W\rangle$ is a martingale. Moreover, $\langle W, W\rangle_t$ is a limit, in probability, of the variation \begin{align*} \sum_{i=1}^n|W_{t_{i}}-W_{t_{i-1}}|^2, \end{align*} over the partition ...


3

Note that, for $0 \leq s < t$, \begin{align*} W_t^3 &= (W_t-W_s+W_s)^3\\ &= (W_t-W_s)^3 + 3(W_t-W_s)^2 W_s + 3 (W_t-W_s) W_s^2 + W_s^3. \end{align*} Moreover, \begin{align*} E\big( (W_t-W_s)^3 \mid \mathcal{F}_s\big) &= E\big( (W_t-W_s)^3\big)\\ &= 0,\\ E\big((W_t-W_s)^2 W_s \mid \mathcal{F}_s\big) &= W_s E\big( (W_t-W_s)^2\big)\\ ...


2

First of all, a filtration $( \mathscr{F}_t )_{t \geq 0 }$ is a "set" of sigma algebras indexed usually by time t that are increasing. That is, for every $t>0$, $\mathscr{F}_t$ is a sigma algebra and $\mathscr{F}_t \subseteq \mathscr{F}_T$ for all $0\leq t \leq T$. The canonical example, is the filtration generated by a process, say Brownian Motion $W$: ...


2

You have $$\widetilde{W}_t=W_t+\int\Theta(u)du$$ which is in general not a Brownian motion, because it has a drift component. But 5.3.1 states $$M_t=M_0+\int \Gamma(u)dW_u\tag{5.3.1}$$ , which holds only for a Brownian motion $W$ (and $M_t$ martingale). So one cannot trivially replace $W_t$ and $W_t+\int\Theta(u)du=\widetilde{W}_t$ in 5.3.2 aswell by ...


2

I think you are on the right track here. You made a sign error in the first line, unfortunately: $$E[W_p W_q W_r] = E[W_r W_p^2 + W_pW_q^2 - W_qW_p^2]=\\ E[(W_r-W_q)W_p^2]+E[W_pW_q^2]= E[W_pW_q^2] $$ The first term is $0$ by independence (as $p<\text{min}(r,q)$ and the square does not affect independence). To take care of the second term we do the ...


2

I am rather a fan of mathematical/statistical software for doing numerical finance (R/Matlab). But returning to your question: The commercial software UNRISK is based on mathematica, a computer algebra system. Usually you can use the Unrisk functions right in mathematica and price financial derivatives there. There also exists Jave interfaces if you want ...


2

\begin{align*} E\Big(W_t^3-3tW_t \mid \mathcal{F}_s\Big) &= E\Big((W_t-W_s+W_s)^3-3t(W_t-W_s+W_s) \mid \mathcal{F}_s\Big) \\ &=E\Big((W_t-W_s)^3+W_s^3+3(W_t-W_s)^2W_s + 3 (W_t-W_s)W_s^2\\ &\qquad \qquad -3t(W_t-W_s)-3tW_s \mid \mathcal{F}_s\Big) \\ &=E\Big((W_t-W_s)^3\Big) + W_s^3+3W_sE\Big((W_t-W_s)^2\Big)\\ &\qquad \qquad + 3W_s^2 ...


2

$ \sigma S $ is in units of dollars per square root of a unit of time. $ \sigma $ is usually quoted as an annual or daily percentage. $ dX ^2 $ is in units of time, as $ E[(dX)^2] = dt $. Here is an online tutorial which you may find helpful. EDIT by kotozna: $\sigma$ has dimensions 1/(square root of time) and $dX$ has dimensions square root of time. ...


2

The above question was a typo due to the author -- the expression should be evaluated as \begin{equation} E(t|\mathcal{F}_{s}^{W}) = t \end{equation} due to the reasoning in the question. Sorry for the noise.


2

this is not the way to do it. The Black-_Scholes argument requires the underlying to be tradable. $S_{t}^{0.5}$ is not tradable. Instead, recognize that the underlying is still $S_t$ but the pay-off has changed to $$ (\alpha S_{t}^{1/2} - \beta)_+ $$ for appropriate constants $\alpha,\beta.$ So the derivation of the BS equation still holds and the ...



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