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Diffusion brings about a standard deviation which increases with the square root of time (just like in Brownian motion), while jumps add variability proportional to time (since the jump times are a Poisson process). So they are quite different. Experience shows that sharp stock market moves do occur (in connection with big news events for example), so ...


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The problem is that what some mean when they say "volatility" is BS implied vol from an option price. What some others mean when they say "volatility" is some diffusion parameter from a drift diffusion model (with or without jumps). These are the same value in the log normal model of stock prices but different for many other models including those with ...


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Jumps are totally different from volatility. Imagine a stock whose price has jumps but has no volatility. The asset pricing implications for options on that stock are totally different than from a stock with volatility. Below I simulated 3 stock paths: (i) Jumps and volatility, (2) Only Jumps and (3) No jumps but higher volatility. As you can imagine the ...


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Quick summary: Your model should still be well specified, as long as: 1) You do the analysis on a heavily traded asset, e.g. IBM on NYSE, and 2) You use heteroskedasticity-consistent standard errors in your estimation framework, e.g. White's standard errors. I'm going to start the long answer by re-stating the question to make sure I've got it right. Let ...



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