Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

For analyzing a series of trades on a single stock over a period of time. You can understand your market timing contribution by comparing your actual return to the return from consistently holding your average exposure to the stock over that whole period. To then get a feeling for how much you are contributing compared to how much you are messing with a ...


1

There's a couple of options other than Google or Yahoo that I am aware of. The NSE provides EOD data, as well as 5,2 and 1 minute data. If you're willing to pay for high quality data for your application, this is an excellent choice. http://www.nseindia.com/supra_global/content/dotex/data_products.htm Quandl provides comparatively clean, free EOD data ...


0

Per its help-page yahoo provides adjusted closing prices on a weekly basis. If that is not sufficient, you can always calculate adjusted closing prices using this formula, however, you would need to know the dividend history of each stock. Those are also available from yahoo finance.


3

This is an interesting topic. I assumed that you are looking for a public data source. Here is the margin data as reported by NYSE organizations (nyxdata) that offers a downloadable file. Here is the page of FINRA for Margin Statistics. This is an HTML page, I did not find a link to download a data file. You can validate the two sources against each ...


2

Position here is the residual amount of one or other currency at the end: You gave us: Time | Amount | Rate | t1 100 1.2636 t2 -1000 1.2599 t3 200 1.1612 Assuming the Amount is amount paid in USD, and the rate is EUR/USD: Time | Amount | Rate | EUR balance | USD balance t0 0 0 t1 ...


1

Use your total wealth allocated to the trades as denominator. Total wealth allocated would include all collateral. In this way you (or your broker) make sure that the denominator is always positive. Presumably this would also reflect what you really want to track. The only problem that remains is what amount of your wealth needs to be allocated. But this is ...


0

It appears that these are actually all the same thing. overnight inventory, end-of-day holdings, end-of-day net position, it all identifies the same thing. The different terminology arises from how, technically, an account's inventory is reconstructed using order book message data. However, they all identify the inventory at market close, i.e. the ...


0

My suggestion would be to use the actual (leveraged) position value, rather than the cost you paid to open the position. Then if you want, you can multiply the return on the position by your leverage, so you might see something like this (if I understood your question correctly): Date PnL Begin End Return 4-Dec -30 4000 3970 ...


0

Position means inventory. See Survey of market making strategies and research What you're puzzling about is what would be the value of your inventory in some risk (PnL) currency other than the currency you actually have. That's why you'd have rates from one currency to another. But the current value of your inventory expressed in terms of some other ...


0

You aren't including how much of your base currency you have in your portfolio. Once you do that your position can be written as $X$ USD and $Y$ EUR. Beyond doing much of the work for your P&L computation, this is also useful for monitoring your risk to FX changes.


1

FIX has some known deficiencies. Repeating groups is one of them. It can be costly in terms of latency to parse repeating groups inside repeating groups, requiring recursive calls. I prefer protocols that send a first message signaling that N messages will follow with the group info. FIX is also too verbose consuming too much bandwidth. For that they have ...



Top 50 recent answers are included