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I'm a Physicist but I'd like to know if there are some methods or models to predict the activity of the clients of a bank. I heard that banks are interested in this sort of analysis so I got curious about it. The thing is I don't know where to find information about this. Is there a name for such type of analysis? Can you recommend any good book to learn such methods?


EDIT (19/11/15)

In particular I'm interested in methods to predict the activity of the clients, say we know their banking movements and we want to know who of them will no longer be active the next month/year, for example.

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    $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is not quantitative modeling based. $\endgroup$ – Gordon Nov 19 '15 at 18:08
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    $\begingroup$ I do not think that there are any quantitative models for this. It appears to be a data mining or customer behaviour problem. I am voting to close this question. $\endgroup$ – Gordon Nov 19 '15 at 18:08
  • $\begingroup$ @Gordon I'm lost in this topic, so could you guide me in order to find information abut this topic, please? $\endgroup$ – Ana S. H. Nov 19 '15 at 20:42
  • $\begingroup$ By feeling, there should have no quantitative models for this, as the data is difficulty to collect. However, you may try to search whether there are any data mining type work that is related customer behaviours. $\endgroup$ – Gordon Nov 19 '15 at 21:04
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I would recommend you the following econometrics textbook Basics Econometrics, with a particular focus on multinomial logit / probit models. I guess the challenging part in your case will consist of specifying the exogenous variables, collecting data, before doing the computations. The latter being quick to perform. As far as I am concerned it's better to design your own model based on the suggested statistical techniques rather than hoping to find on Internet existing bank models which deals stricto sensu with this specific task. Hope it helps

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