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Assuming day 1 my wealth is 1. At day 2 I earned 20%. So the rate of return is 0.2 and the wealth at day 2 is 1.2. At day 3 I earned 50 % again. So the wealth at day 3 is 1.8. I wonder what is the value of 1, 1.2, 1.5 for each is called in academic?

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closed as off-topic by vonjd, LocalVolatility, chollida, phdstudent, Bob Jansen Mar 23 '18 at 9:09

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    $\begingroup$ It's called 'Gross return' (a.k.a. 'Gross Rate of Return') $\endgroup$ – rbm Mar 10 '18 at 13:56
  • $\begingroup$ In Finance it is always called Gross Return, in Statistics it is called a 'link relative' or 'chain relative' (because it links together (via multiplication) adjacent terms of the CPI index for ex.) and you may occasionally see this term also. $\endgroup$ – Alex C Mar 10 '18 at 15:47
  • $\begingroup$ @rbm, AlexC could one of you post it as an answer? It's not a great question but it can't hurt to have it properly answered $\endgroup$ – Bob Jansen Mar 10 '18 at 17:24
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It's called 'Gross return' (a.k.a. 'Gross Rate of Return'). See Zivot Course Notes Eqn. 1.8

Also, as pointed by Alex C:

... in Statistics it is called a 'link relative' or 'chain relative' (because it links together (via multiplication) adjacent terms of the CPI index or other time series)

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