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6
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In general, it depends on the particular ETF, and should be checked in the prospectus, but one standard way (e.g. SPY) is to do it on a daily basis based on NAV published after the close. E.g. …
answered Oct 26 '11 by LazyCat
2
votes
Many funds, that manage ETFs provide this on their webpages. E.g. SDPR (SPY, XL* family) has is in "NAV history" xls file on https://www.spdrs.com/product/fund.seam?ticker=SPY
answered Apr 2 '15 by LazyCat
0
votes
Frankly, unless you can find a free source, that does exactly what you want, you're better off finding a historical dataset with intraday ETF prices, say with 5min resolution, and computing volatility …
answered Jan 11 '19 by LazyCat
2
votes
One standard strategy is to short both "bull" and "bear" ETFs (usually called "double short"). A bit naive heuristics is that if you're loosing money holding a long position due to volatility, you can …
answered Dec 18 '15 by LazyCat
0
votes
VXX is an ETN, not an ETF, so when you buy a share of VXX, you are not buying a share in its holdings, like it is the case for ETFs (from VXX prospectus: "Owning the ETNs is not the same as owning interests …
answered Nov 4 '15 by LazyCat