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Ernest Chan talks about how backward adjusted prices induce a look-ahead bias in the comments of one of his blog posts, Beware of Low Frequency Data. Scroll down in the comments to when he's responding to Samuel. Essentially when using backward adjusted prices, you must look at the entire dataset and backward adjust everything so that the latest adjusted ...


3

Only unadjusted data will permit you to see the stock split. You cannot look at adjusted data and tell if a split occurred. The are a variety of sites that list stock splits (Google: "Stock Split Calendar"). Fidelity provides a reliable one on a monthly basis. You'll have to capture it a month at a time of you want a historical list: https://eresearch....


3

This sounds like a classic, introductory corporate finance question. If interest payments on debt are tax deductible, increasing debt lowers corporate income taxes. Taking total firm cash flows as given, increasing debt effectively redirects cash flows from the government to equity holders. With no counteracting forces, firm owners will choose an all debt ...


1

The kinds of corporate actions that would affect equities in the index context are splits, reverese splits, stock dividends, etc. E.g., you start out with 1 share, and the next day you have 2 shares worth half the old price, but the same net claim on the corporation. But these corporate actions don't affect bonds. You have an obligation promising to repay ...


1

All the events that affect shares outstanding happen overnight.


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For derivatives, there usually exists some agreement between the counterparties on how to handle corporate actions. The same for exchange traded contracts. EUREX, for example, has some pieces on the treatment of corporate actions and also mergers, here: https://www.eurexchange.com/exchange-en/products/equ/corporate-actions-procedures


1

I don't think you'll find a Bloomberg FLDS event to get all upcoming corporate actions. But using the terminal you can use CACS<GO> to get a list of all upcoming corporate actions for a particular ticker. I'm not sure if you can do the same whit an equity screen EQS.


1

This isn't a question related to quantitative finance. I'm voting to close but I will answer your question. I assume by "giving up equity", you exclude "giving up equity" to family or charitable trusts endowed by family. In that case, your premise is incorrect. Bosch is one of the largest companies in the world by employee count. 100% of it is owned by the ...


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