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Your “coffee price” is spot. Your “coffee index” (or ETF) is excess/total returns, i.e. it includes index rolls. That is the impact of the contango or backwardation of coffee futures as they roll from one contract to the next. See: https://www.bloomberg.com/quote/BCOMSP:IND https://www.bloomberg.com/quote/BCOM:IND Commodity prices are down 10% in 5 ...


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You don't have to back out the expense ratio manually. The expenses are deducted from the ETF NAV and baked into the price of the ETFs. From the link below: You won't find them on your account statement The cost of investing is usually associated with trading commissions and account service fees—items you see as "debits" from your accounts. ...


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in a previous question you were looking at using the VWAP price of SPY as a possible technical indicator or input variable in your investment decision process. The difficulty that you are going to encounter is that SPY and the S&P 500 future (right now ESU9) are interchangeable. Here is a chart from Bloomberg showing SPY vs ESU9 from Bloomberg. Now ...


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yahoo finance has downloadable price history for this and others. They include the adjusted price which can be used to calculate the total return without any adjustments.


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Special Relationship and the added dimension to VWAP. As we know the expiry’s final settlement price is the last 30 minutes-weighted average price of the spot market. Due to this, many investors/traders get confused with the prices and some option prices may look like an arbitrage or free money (options quoting below intrinsic value). This may not be ...


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If the Index is priced in EUR based on the methodology, then that has an outsized effect on performance versus spot futures priced in USD. From 2001 to 2009, the EUR appreciated from near parity with the dollar to trading around 1.50 in November 2009. The futures roll returns are not important because that particular index BUKCDE is not an excess or total ...


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This is a very good question, and I don't mean that in the usual academic platitude sense! Imagine you or I wanted to replicate VOO ourselves. To manage the liquidity of inflows and of potential outflows, we'd need to run a few percent of NAV in cash. Which would mean our stock portfolio would have a beta of slightly less than 1. There "should" then be some ...


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you need to look at the correct data sources. SPY and VOO both charge management fees. These fees will decrease the value of the fund and they are charged every day. The fees are small enough that you will not see them clearly versus the fluctuation from NAV. Let's do this with VOO: Look on Bloomberg at the ticker "VOONV Index" for the actual Net ...


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