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12

What has changed The API is gone. The new downloads need 1st to parse the Yahoo Finance page to find a hidden crumb and use it as the key for data retrieval over a 2nd URL. The adjusted close is sometimes the adjusted, sometimes is the non-adjusted and sometimes is a different value Lines with literally "null" as the value for the prices have been ...


4

The stock was split into two share classes, the series that you might be looking for is under the ticker GOOGL.


4

This is not something you will want to hear, but most free websites have licensing issues and display limited or no download links for S&P and DJI. I recommend you use quantdl or stooq instead. Here are some stooq download links: DJI: https://stooq.com/q/d/l/?s=^dji&i=d S&P: https://stooq.com/q/d/l/?s=^spx&i=d You do need to clean up ...


3

Technically speaking, you can include the exchange code along with the symbol. For example, for INFY on NYSE, you can do: web.DataReader('NYSE:INFY', 'google') However, it appears that Google Finance does not allow you to export EPA data, so EPA:INFY wouldn't work and you'll need to find a different data provider.


2

The wsj website lets you download csv data for DJI. If you play around a little bit, you can figure out the url query to kick off a download. The, you can use Powershell to make the download programmatic (note: this script also accesses stock quotes from yahoo finance using their currently available csv download method) (Note: the codes for the yahoo query ...


2

Symbol for DJIA is ".DJI" (without the quotes but with the leading period) https://www.google.com/finance/historical?q=.DJI&startdate=Jun+01%2C+2017&output=txt Symbol for NASDAQ is ".IXIC" (without the quotes but with the leading period) https://www.google.com/finance/historical?q=.IXIC&startdate=Jun+01%2C+2017&output=txt Symbol for S&...


2

There isn't a reliable mechanism. Some things to think about: It's common for venues to abuse the security reference of the primary venue to mean anywhere that this security is traded. So - for some venues and data sources - if they talk about trading the LSE-listing of RIO on Bats Europe, they will refer to that as RIO.L. I believe your examples above have ...


2

These URLs should not have changed. Note, however, that you may sometimes get one of these I'm not a robot captchas. So if you are loading the returned data programmatically (say, via Python), then you may run into issues when Google randomly slips in one of these captchas.


2

No. I’m watching the management of a penny stock manipulate its share price by announcing a reverse stock split and yahoo hasn’t adjusted its prices going on a week and a half. The algorithms thinks it’s a huge breakout and are buying. There’s plenty of opportunity to pickoff bad data.


1

You can't download the S&P data from Google finance like you can with stock or ETF data. If you navigate to https://www.google.com/finance/historical?q=NYSEARCA%3ASPY&ei=L-keWcHYIdGSmgHtu5rYDw you will notice the link to download to a .csv on the right. If you add &output=csv to the above URL it will download the SPY data to a .csv Compare ...


1

interestingly enough, using yahoo with the right ticker symbol does give you the European prices web.DataReader('INFY.PA', 'yahoo')


1

Pandas DataReader (separate library to Pandas) works with Yahoo finance (not google finance). Installation: pip install pandas_datareader Code: I just run the below to get the SPX data between 2010 and 2015 and it works: This link here has an up-to-date list of supported data providers (Yahoo is not there right now but the code still works as shown above &...


1

There is a similar question (not fully duplicate), but still -- the answer may provide a sufficient information. In short, the reasons for discrepancies is usually: initial data sources (historical parts) the way data are collected (pure end-of-day or tick data) the way adjustments and corporate actions are handled the way post-trade corrections are ...


1

Google uses the 1 factor CAPM model developed by Fama French (1974). Its a simple linear regression with the stock as dependent variable and the market portfolio as independent


1

According to a comment on another post here: ". It regresses against the SP500 using MONTH-END closing prices for the last five years." - @Dimitri


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