36

I would offer the distinctions are i) pure statistical approach, ii) equilibrium based approach, and iii) empirical approach. The statistical approach includes data mining. Its techniques originate in statistics and machine learning. In its extreme there is no a priori theoretical structure imposed on asset returns. Factor structure might be identified thru ...


26

It's an interesting question. I particularly agree with the $\mathbb{Q}-\mathbb{P}$ dichotomy mentioned by many. I would add to the other answers that, come to think of it, the Black-Scholes postulated Geometric Brownian Motion could be interpreted as an AR(1) process on the logarithm of the stock price as you discretise the SDE from which it is a solution,...


16

I think you have the correct dichotomy here. Things started in the late 1980s and through the 1990s with analytical approaches particularly to derivative pricing (as in "hey, let's create yet another exotic option we can sell to the buy side"). The risk modelling "fashion" of the 1990s (when regulated entities such as banks needed to beef up reporting) ...


14

There are few things to consider. Trading moves the price, to minimize market impact and maximize return it is generally optimal to split an order in several child orders. See the Kyle model. Splitting optimally dependents on specific assumptions that you make. The simplest (and first) approach is that of Berstsimas and Lo (Optimal Control of Execution ...


14

I think you need to differentiate between Q-quants vs P-quants. The former might not use Econometrics, but P-quants use them a lot.


12

Interest rates in general are far from independent and identically distributed. A high interest rate observation is quite likely to be followed by another high observation, and the volatility is likely to be higher as well. Interest rates are also mean reverting, as in most real-world situations (at least for developed markets) interest rates rarely rise ...


11

Traditional econometric (time series) models are of little or no value in forecasting market prices for purposes of "making money", i.e, generating excess return over a benchmark in an asset management setting. They have some limited value in strategic and tactical asset allocation. The ineffectiveness of time-series modeling in asset management stems ...


9

High VIX arguably leads to less predictability of the market factor (i.e. market timing), but high volatility does lead to greater predictability of the cross-section of returns. Indeed, linear risk factor models have higher explanatory power during bear markets. However, your goal is to build a better market timing model where the forecasts (and perhaps ...


9

There are many different ways a pricing model can be better : It can allow to reproduce the observed market price (Fit criterion) It takes into account a specific recognized behaviour of the underlying S, say the forward smile dynamic. If you write a product whose value is mostly derived from said behaviour, you dont want to miss that aspect. (Don't fill ...


9

GARCH will work if volume has memory with some decay. AR will work if volume has mean reversion properties. Both of these are empirical questions and depend on the market. You should also consider if there are seasonal (day-of-week, monthly, quarterly effects) in which case you would want to add dummy variables. MA models will work well if volume behaves ...


9

To recover the Black-Scholes pricing equation, you should first express the standard normal cdf in terms of its characteristic function analogous to the Heston solution: $$ N(x) = \frac{1}{2} - \frac{1}{\pi} \int_0^{\infty} Re [\frac{e^{-i\phi x} f(\phi)}{i\phi}] d\phi $$ where $f(\phi)$ is the characteristic function of the standard normal distribution: $$ ...


9

The best paper is probably Relative Volume as a Doubly Stochastic Binomial Point Process - James Mcculloch. In this paper the volume is modelled via a Point Process, and theoretical laws are derived (with confident intervals, etc). And we put elements about this in Market Microstructure in Practice, Chap 2.1. Volume curves are analyzed, not only during the ...


8

There are certainly (short-rate) models which assume bounded interest rates. I suppose I should clarify - the design of the model prohibits negative interest rates. Further, some models asymptotically reach some target, or mean rate which is considered mean reversion, the most famous perhaps the Vasicek. Short rate models where rates cannot go negative: Cox-...


8

Attilio Meucci does some very interesting things with PCA. See e.g. his paper on managing diversification which makes heavy use of it (and explains it very intuitively along the way): Managing Diversification by Attilio Meucci


7

Is your question more about approaches taken on the buy side vs. sell side? If so, you may want to read Attilio Meucci's paper, P vs. Q, on this topic. He breaks down the dichotomy as derivatives pricing (the "Q" world), which uses a lot of very sophisticated modeling involving Ito calculus and PDEs, and portfolio management (the "P" world), which makes ...


7

There is a huge difference between R (and Matlab, SAS, or other statistical languages) and relatively low-level languages such as C/C++/C#/Java in exactly this regard. The latter category is used more often for stable end-products, where speed and performance can be crucial, whereas the former category is used more often for model testing and prototyping. ...


7

The investor's holdings is a consequence of an investor's utility function interacting with the investor's perceived trading opportunity subject to constraints. (Indeed, the Kelly criterion is also utility maximizing.) We produced trades by re-balancing -- that is to say, we have new expectations of alpha or risk and the optimal portfolio net of these ...


7

Aleš Černý has very simple examples in his book. Alternatively, this paper seems to recap part of the chapter on Fourier series: Introduction to Fast Fourier Transform in Finance - Aleš Černý


7

To provide a straight forward answer: It is not a good model. It never was, it never will be. Until we all do not come up with a better model that provides better modeling accuracy while it is equally intuitive and makes similarly simplifying assumptions the BS model with its geometric brownian motion component is here to stay. It actually does not matter ...


7

Having thought about this I think the following reason is also important and wasn't mentioned so far: When you look at the inner working of this whole class of econometric models it all boils down to the following: It is possible (under some reasonable assumptions) to express any $MA(q)$ model as an $AR(\infty)$ model (and vice-versa for expressing $AR(p)$ ...


6

You could try using the Gaussian Affine Term Structure Models (GATSM), with the right boundary conditions to stop rates being negative (in the style of their Black implementation). See, for example, Monika Piazzesi, the "Affine Term Structure Models" if you want to enter/modify the basis or the work of Krippner, for example "Measuring the stance of monetary ...


6

I assume you're using returns to compute beta, not the prices. And yes, remove the "jumps", though this should happen automatically since you're looking only at intraday returns. One final piece of advice: you'll get more meaningful results if you smooth the returns via a moving average.


6

In the way that you have posed the question, I would say that we are here discussing a derivative-pricing model rather than a predictive model. That's an important distinction because a predictive model would be assessed by its ability to generate money. In contrast, I think of derivative pricing as a fancy way of doing interpolation/extrapolation on ...


6

From an academic viewpoint you do not have a lot of choices: The Rosenbaum-Robert approach, the price model with uncertainty zones is a model of trades and duration between trades (implicitly). It is worthwhile to try it. You can also use an Hawkes process, it will have the nice effect of capturing clustering effects on trades. if you want to use ...


6

I have honestly not come across a good book (or good enough review to make me buy the book) on Fund Transfer Pricing. While it is not my career focus, I had to familiarize myself a bit with the topic because of certain requirements involving funding trading operations and the performance of funding specific operations. Personally I would recommend the ...


6

When the pdf of a distribution is not known analytically, it's common to compute by taking the inverse Fourier transform of its characteristic function. The same idea applies here. Consider the discounted expectation formula of a European option $$V (S,\tau) = e^{-r\tau} \mathbb{E}_{x_0} [\theta(x_T)] $$. for log prices $x$ and time to expiry $\tau=T-t$. In ...


6

One can use the Karhunen–Loève expansion to approximate a trajectory of a Wiener Process, which can be used to model the evolvement of returns in time. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karhunen%E2%80%93Lo%C3%A8ve_theorem#The_Wiener_process) Though the Karhunen–Loève expansion has theoretical advantages to other variants to generate a trajectory of a Wiener ...


6

Fourier methods use sine and cosine functions, and are used in calculating option prices, VaR, time series analysis etc. It is an alternative process for doing many things in finance. Some links Fourier Methods in trading on StackExchange and Wiki


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