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7

If you look at tick data, you will probably get an even better analysis. However, vix correlation tends to be negative with spx but remember that this is generally more true for when spx tanks. When spx goes up, the correlation isn't as strong. Why? People panic after a drop, therefore leading to people buying options. They don't care about black scholes ...


5

There was a methodology change in how volume is reported. Now it is using the consolidated tape including trades on all exchanges. See: http://stockcharts.com/articles/dont_ignore_this_chart/2016/12/whats-the-deal-with-that-intraday-volume-on-the-dow-indu.html


4

1 - For historical reasons options expire on Saturdays, before noon. This has to do with potential reconciliation issues that are largely gone nowadays because of back-office automation. Practically, you can think of SPX index options as expiring at index settle, which is 4:00 pm EST on Fridays for PM expiring options, or 9:30 am EST on Fridays for serial ...


4

The VIX is designed to "represent the implied volatility of a hypothetical at-the-money [SPX] option with exactly 30 days to expiration." (via the CBOE) The calculations are available from the CBOE in this white paper. Note that your question is wrong -- it is the implied volatility, not the vega. Moreover, you wouldn't predict a change in vega (which is a ...


4

This site has the company name, symbol, and index weight of all 3 indexes you are asking about. The data is not downloadable, however, simply copying and pasting the data from the page into a spreadsheet works as does scraping the page. SlickCharts.com


4

Calculate the beta of the VIX Dec 18 contract to the SPY. Then apply this equation: $$\ hedge \ ratio = \frac{1000\beta}{SPY_{price} } $$ You then take the hedge ratio round it and that will give you the approximate amount of shares to hedge with. This is a simple solution. There are other ways to calculate the hedge ratio. Just as a note, this will ...


3

A company's market capitalization does not change because it did not trade. Index calculations are based upon the last traded price of each constituent security. There is no difference to the index level in a stock not trading and it remaining flat for the day (i.e. no change in price since the last close price). Some indices have liquidity limits, so if ...


3

You can think of both ( difference and ratio ) indicators as some aggregated measure of difference between flat vol (ATM vol) and "total vol" than includes skew and kurtosis effects.


3

These options are not "issued" in the same way, say, employee stock options are "issued". Instead, the expiration months already exist indefinitely into the future, and in a sense options at all expirations already exist. The data series therefore start showing prints when market interest in a given expiration date starts up. This is of course highly ...


3

Yes, all of VIX futures are based on THEIR RESPECTIVE front month options, so you have to realize that for long-dated VIX futures these are long-dated options. So for example settlement value of VIX DEC 12 futures will be based on SPX JAN 13 options, which will be front-month options at the time of VIX futures expiration.


3

They'll be correlated, and generally close to one another, but rarely identical. In fact differences of 2 points in implied vol are common. The reason for the differences comes down to the portfolio construction and tracking error of the SPY ETF. While generally quite low over a long period of time, the tracking error on a 1-day or less basis can be ...


3

You are very close. VIX vol is indeed a vol-of-vol. However the way VIX options actually work is that they expire into the futures, which themselves have value derived from 30-day options on expiration day. That is to say, the VIX spot index today has no direct relationship to the VIX options you can trade today. A VIX option vol is the volatility of (...


2

I don't know if I understand your question correctly but the procedure how to calculate ATM option prices with publicly available implied volatility indices (like VXO) for the vol parameter can be found in the mentioned paper on pages 5-7: How Students Can Backtest Madoff’s Claims by Michael J. Stutzer (2009)


2

opp_volume is probably option volume (not sure why it would be shortened to opp with extra p), not open interest. Volume is also more likely to be zero than open interest. The rest is like @SRKX wrote.


2

Best bid is the highest price somebody is willing to pay to buy the option. Best off is the lowest price somebody is willing to accept to sell the option. Even if there is no trade, there may very well be limit orders in the order book: there is a potential market but offer and demand are still too far away from each other for trades to happen.


2

When I saw these curves they seemed very strange to me. I believe it is a data-quality issue.I went to Bloomberg and I retrieved the implied vols for 70 near ATM strikes of the weekly SPX options expiring November 27 2015 (I believe that is the yellow curve in your diagrams i.e. November 4th week). This was today 2015-oct-27 at about 15:00 New York time. As ...


2

Multiple stock databases hold this data, but none of them are free. If you are in an academic setting, see if your university has a subscription to CRSP. If you want to split it yourself, you can use different cutoff points for P/E. High P/E = growth, low P/E = value.


2

If you're looking for S&P 500 stock prices, yahoo finance is usually a good source. If you're looking for all of them together datasets are available on github. If you're looking to split between value vs growth you can use any general equity research firm to create the split between growth and value, otherwise use a broad definition from a site like ...


2

Have found that using Alpha =0.06, Beta =0.93, omega =0.01 works fairly well. That is from calibrating to histories over quite long time periods.


2

CRSP will give you returns with dividends and without dividends from SPX which allow you to compute those. If you do not have access you can use the data from this paper: "On the Importance of Measuring Payout Yield: Implications for Empirical Asset Pricing," Boudoukh, Michaely, Richardson, Journal of Finance, 2007. The data is freely available here: http://...


1

This is a very good question, and I don't mean that in the usual academic platitude sense! Imagine you or I wanted to replicate VOO ourselves. To manage the liquidity of inflows and of potential outflows, we'd need to run a few percent of NAV in cash. Which would mean our stock portfolio would have a beta of slightly less than 1. There "should" then be some ...


1

you need to look at the correct data sources. SPY and VOO both charge management fees. These fees will decrease the value of the fund and they are charged every day. The fees are small enough that you will not see them clearly versus the fluctuation from NAV. Let's do this with VOO: Look on Bloomberg at the ticker "VOONV Index" for the actual Net ...


1

I created a site to collect some useful macro financial indicators and hopeful can continue adding more data in my spare time. Hopefully it can help you: https://datamatrixweb.com/


1

I think this is an error. This is a chart of SPX price and volume I pulled off Bloomberg. The volume does not go up after 12/7/2016 according to this chart.


1

This is a Yahoo data issue - you should contact them regarding their symbols and availability of data. It might just be that the index is not covered by them or they are restricted from providing historical data. Also note that you have referenced ETFs (XLV, XLI, etc.) that trade on NYSE Arca as being sector-based subsets of the S&P 500. These ETFs are ...


1

Generally speaking, volatilities at all points of the vol surface are (positively) correlated in both empirical and theoretical models. So if you feel you have a prediction strategy for the VIX, you have an associated directional prediction for other volatilities, and you can take advantage of that. Directional volatility bets are most often expressed (as ...


1

Your Vega of 188.48 is correct, in the sense that matches my calculation. What it means is that if the volatility increase by 1 (i.e. by 100 percentage points, from 19.14% to 119.14%) the call will increase by 188 dollars. Obviously that is an unrealistic move. More realistically if the volatility increases by 0.01 (i.e. 1 percentage point, from 19.14% to 20....


1

You need to use log of prices, because log of returns are normally distributed. So or where x is return- $$ x=-\frac{1}{\tau} ln(\frac{S_{t+\tau}}{S_{t}}) $$ The annualized standard deviation can be scaled as +/-$ n\frac{\sigma}{\sqrt{\tau}} $ where n is your multiple. You can either ignore or estimate drift. or look at it another way, S refers to the index $...


1

In general futures are contract which are marked to market everyday and are settled against the cash/underlying price at a future delivery date. For the SPX, I think there are only deliveries in Mar, Jun, Sep and Dec. In theory, one can calculate the implied future price using the short rates and the spot price. One thing to note is that there is a ...


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