0
$\begingroup$

I need to calculate the effective interest rate a company X is paying on the total debt it has been loaned (to arrive at the Cost of Debt) for the FY 2011-12. Its long term borrowings are a mix of bonds that will be redeemed on different dates carrying different coupon rates as such:

  1. 10,700 Bonds of face value of 1,000,000/- each, allotted on 10th September 2008, are redeemable at par on 10th September 2018. The bonds carry a coupon rate of 11.00 % p.a. payable annually on 15th September.
  2. 14,150 Bonds of face value of 1,000,000/- each, allotted on 21st December 2011, are redeemable at par on 21st December 2016 with put/call option after 18 months from the date of allotment. The bonds carry a coupon rate of 9.28 % p.a. annually on 21st June each year.
  3. 16,000 Bonds of face value of 1,000,000/- each, allotted on 11th December 2008, are redeemable at par on 11th December 2016. The bonds carry a coupon rate of 10.70 % p.a. payable annually on 30th June each year.
  4. 158 Bonds of face value of 26,000,000/- each allotted on 18th July, 2001 are redeemable in 13 equal installments from the end of the 3rd year upto the end of 15th year from the date of allotment. Accordingly, 8th installment was paid in July 2011. The Bonds carry a coupon rate of 10.25% p.a. payable annually on 30th September.

My question is, how do I arrive at the pre-tax Cost of Debt for this company, if it is to be calculated as the interest rate on its borrowings?

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

For FY2012 you may calculate the yield on each bond, and then use marketvalue-weighted average to arrive at pre-tax cost of debt.

If you dont have market prices, I would suggest face-weighted coupon average.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks but if I don't have market prices, how should I calculate yield? $\endgroup$ – brchan Jul 3 '14 at 17:00
  • $\begingroup$ I doubt that there is no other information given, but the best you can do is to use the average coupon weighted by face value. $\endgroup$ – emcor Jul 3 '14 at 17:18

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.