0
$\begingroup$

https://www.zacks.com/stock/research/DOCN/earnings-calendar

The above source says the EPSs are the following

- 8/5/2021 $0.07    
- 5/6/2021 $0.00    

https://finance.yahoo.com/calendar/earnings?symbol=DOCN

The above source says the EPSs are the following.

- 8/5/2021: -$0.02
- 5/6/2021: -$0.07  

https://seekingalpha.com/symbol/DOCN/earnings

The above source says the EPS is the following

- 8/5/2021: $0.10

So the results are inconsistent. How to check which one is correct using the official data from SEC?

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

The sad fact here is that "earnings" on the numerator can be measured in a multitude of ways. The "per share" should be consistent (although these can differ a little, depending on whether one uses the year-end vs the year-average share count).

More normal is the variation across different "E" figures. First of all, you need to make sure that one is not reporting the last quarter's results, while the other is reporting the rolling L12m, ie the sum of the same over the last four quarters reported.

Even assuming consistent time-horizons, the "E" can differ, depending on the source. There is GAAP accounting (or IFRS outside the US), which is the headline number reported in the company's accounts. The issue here is how one deals with one-off "exceptionals" that are not represntative of the company's underlying true profitability. So you have an "operating EPS" that strips out below-the-line one-off exceptional charges or gains. And then you have "adjusted EPS" that is the analyst community's opinion on what the true repeatable profits were and will be, both being comparable to each other.

Each has its strengths and weaknesses. The bottom line is that there are multiple "E" numbers on the numerator out there. Profits being an accounting opinion, from first principles.

The trick here is to be very clear exactly what one is looking at in each and very such measure, DEM

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

You go to the horse's mouth - go to the company's web site and look for their SEC filings. https://investors.digitalocean.com/financials/sec-filings/default.aspx , find "08/06/2021 Form10-Q Quarterly Report" and click on ".xls" - excel spreadsheet.

In the spreadsheet, you go to the "Income Statement" tab, and you look for "Net loss per share attributable to common stockholders, basic and diluted". For the quarter ending June 30, 2021, it is indeed -0.02, which matches Yahoo Finance.

Or go to SEC's Edgar and look there: https://sec.report/CIK/0001582961 (their CIK#) and click on "10-Q Quarterly Report [latest filing - 2021-08-05 19:34:33]" and look for "Net loss per share attributable to common stockholders, basic and diluted" - same number.

This ratio is obtained by dividing "Net loss attributable to common stockholders" by "Weighted-average shares used to compute net loss per share, basic and diluted". Without rounding, they lost a little more, -0.0204...

As for why Zacks has a different figure, you'd need to ask Zack's. Maybe it's the 6 months figure (1H21) rather than 2Q21? (As a general principle, you should be skeptical of any data that you get for free from the Internet - trust no one.)

$\endgroup$
4
  • $\begingroup$ nasdaq.com/market-activity/stocks/docn/earnings I see the EPS at nasdaq is -$0.02 for Q2 2021. Are the data from nasdaq.com trustworthy in general? $\endgroup$ Aug 23 '21 at 2:09
  • $\begingroup$ Regarding the consensus EPS forcast, where I can find out who predicted them and how the prediction is caculated? $\endgroup$ Aug 23 '21 at 2:10
  • $\begingroup$ The nasdaq data seems to be from Zacks. How come the data on nasdaq is correct but not the data on Zacks website? $\endgroup$ Aug 23 '21 at 2:12
  • $\begingroup$ As far as I know (this opinion may be out of date) the best database to see which analyst predicted what earnings is I/B/E/S (Institutional Brokers' Estimate System) I think it's now owned by Refinitiv refinitiv.com/en/financial-data/company-data/… Others may know better / newer tools. $\endgroup$ Aug 23 '21 at 2:46

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.