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2

Most credit default swaps are quoted as CDS spread (the fraction of the notional that the protection buyer would pay every year for a given CDS maturity). However the contract that's actually traded is more likely to have standardized running spread and an upfront fee. Moreover, some names on the verge of default are quoted as upfront. To calculate the ...


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I think you are missing the eval date, and then there are some subleties in how Excel/QL setup discount factors etc.: import QuantLib as ql now, you forgot this step: ql.Settings.instance().evaluationDate = ql.Date(15,5,2021) and then coupon = 0.00375 yld = 0.01 start = ql.Date(15,5,2021) maturity = ql.Date(30,11,2025) schedule = ql.Schedule(start, ...


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The difference is that they are completely different things. Let's start with gold futures. Gold futures, if held to delivery, delivery spot gold -- say 100oz gold bars out of NY. So if you sell front gold, roll to next, and so on, you effectively are short a future against the "same gold". Or you can think of it like that because being short Feb ...


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Because exchahnge-traded FX futures have standard monthly dates, it's very unlkely that you can use FX futures to replicate exactly the bond's coupons. However you can use a series of OTC FX forwards or a cross-currency swap to swap some bond's coupons into another currency (fixed or floating). Look up "cross-currency asset swap". For example, you ...


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Yes, you can consider a bond yield curve to be like any funding curve, and in particular get risky discount factors from it, and use them, for example, to discount cash flows. Test that if you pv the bonds used to build the yield curve, you get back the input dirty price. Be careful how you interpolate. Don't mix different kinds of instruments (e.g. zero-...


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